The Circle of Every Little Thing

Consumers begin to see responsible products not only as a good move for the future, but as a paradigm shift that needs to happen now. The circular economy suggests that our products will no longer just support our own needs, they will participate in a much bigger system.

We live in a world full of alarms; conflicts, terror and environmental disasters. It makes consumers increasingly worried and aware. As a reaction to this, consumers begin to see responsible products not only as a good move for the future, but as a paradigm shift that needs to happen now. The circular economy suggests that our products will no longer just support our own needs, they will participate in a much bigger system. We will need to continue pushing the boundaries of the circular economy and rethink products in terms of the entire value chain. In this movement, we need to see many more companies and organizations working together, across silos, towards better consumer behavior, encouraging responsible consumption. Consumers realize that their current consumption patterns need to be changed. To make this happen they are turning to the companies who respond and make action of their promises.

TO CONSIDER

-Think circularity, think across value chain, rethink waste

-How can you start with small actions (instead of the big words)?

-How can your products/services be participants in a bigger system?

-How can you work more across silos, companies and organisations?

GOOD EXAMPLES

Parley for the Oceans addresses major threats towards the oceans, the most important ecosystem of our planet. Parley believes the power for change lies in the hands of the consumer – given he has a choice – and the power to shape this new consumer mindset lies in the hands of the creative industries. Artists, musicians, actors, filmmakers, fashion designers, journalists, architects, product inventors, and scientists have the tools to mold the reality we live in and to develop alternative business models and ecologically sensible products to give us earthlings an alternative choice, an everyday option to change something.

Stella McCartney has woven sustainability into her company. She is open about the challenge/paradox of being both sustainable and fashionable at the same time. McCartney says that building environmentally sustainable practices into her own business has been a long-term commitment. Stella has made the brand highly visible in sustainable discussions globally, making her an opinion leader within the area. “We believe that the future of fashion is circular – it will be restorative and regenerative by design and the clothes we love never end up as waste.”

Make Smart Matter

Consumers are embracing the smartness which is seamlessly integrated in their reality. It is the marriage of technology and simplicity that will help brands connect with consumers in exceptional ways.

Amazon Go

Consumers can shop anytime, anywhere and are becoming increasingly demanding in terms of convenience. New technology integrated in consumers’ product experiences is only going to grow, advances in materials science, components are getting smaller. As this sector is quickly evolving in many areas, one thing is clear though; consumers and brand owners now want usable products, that adds real value to their lives, rather than short-term marketing gimmicks. How can smart components help prevent food waste, ensure product safety, generate and store meaningful data for medical purpose, or make the weekly shopping easier? Consumers are embracing the smartness which is seamlessly integrated in their reality. It is the marriage of technology and simplicity that will help brands connect with consumers in exceptional ways.

TO CONSIDER

-What real consumer problems needs to be solved?

-How can I create a seamless experience, integrated in consumers’ lifestyle?

-How can the solution be intuitive?

GOOD EXAMPLE

Amazon Go is a new kind of store with no checkout required. Amazon created the world’s most advanced shopping technology so you never have to wait in line. Use the Amazon Go app to enter the store, take the products you want, and go! Amazon uses sensors, video-technology and AI-algoritms to enable this convenient shopping experience.

By Kristina de Verdier on 24 March, 2017 In , , ,

Trending by Jonas Lundin

Jonas Lundin is writing about the new dawn for the stand-up pouch. “About a decade ago, the packaging industry anticipated a new revolution in packaging, even if not new to the world (The patent hails back from the 1960s), the Stand-Up-Pouch packaging solution were popping up in shelves around the globe, not only in the…

Jonas Lundin is writing about the new dawn for the stand-up pouch.

“About a decade ago, the packaging industry anticipated a new revolution in packaging, even if not new to the world (The patent hails back from the 1960s), the Stand-Up-Pouch packaging solution were popping up in shelves around the globe, not only in the usual-suspect orange-beverage it’s so heavily associated with, but in more premium categories and brands. However, the predicted boom were, if a boom at all, short-lived as a more premium packaging. The shiny, often flimsy, pouches weren’t perceived by consumers as neither functional, premium nor in-line with current trends, and retailers weren’t too happy about the little bags that seemingly lived their own life on the shelves. But perhaps the time is now, with improved rigidity, refined closures (screw-tops, spouts and even velcro solutions), and a shift towards more matte and paper-feel finishes that tags along well with current trends of ecology, craftsmanship and a general tiredness of over-packaged products, the Stand-Up may just win consumers hearts across categories.”

Alex Bugovsky of CP+B fame, together with US, Colorado based Good Apples. They recently created a rather intriguing packaging for Superfood maker Skoop, sporting a tongue-in-cheek copy and info-graphic-esque design.

Oloves recently re-branded and re-packed their range of olives into stand-up-pouches with a matte, paper-feel finish and hand-drawn graphics.

Noteworhty is also US based Pentagram’s re-brand of Nuts.com’s packaging. With bright ”here-I-am” colour-scheme and matte finish, that is for sure standing out in the snacks-section.

By Kristina de Verdier on 8 April, 2014 In , , , ,

Landor about packaging

Landor Associates publishes a packaging trends forecast. 5 areas they foresee will be further discovered and focused on, in 2014. “Trends in packaging are demonstrating slow but steady innovation that keeps customers engaged and excited. Green packaging in particular is coming of age, evolving to add perks well beyond efficiency and waste reduction.” Read the 5 areas below and the full…

Landor Associates publishes a packaging trends forecast. 5 areas they foresee will be further discovered and focused on, in 2014. “Trends in packaging are demonstrating slow but steady innovation that keeps customers engaged and excited. Green packaging in particular is coming of age, evolving to add perks well beyond efficiency and waste reduction.” Read the 5 areas below and the full report here.

Plant-based choices

Bioresins and plant-based packaging will continue coming to market in 2014. In addition to simply replacing plastics with these materials, manufacturers are finding innovative uses for biological packaging to give consumers extra product benefits. The potato starch and paper container from Veuve Clicquot is not only 100 percent biodegradable and recyclable, it also insulates the bottle, keeping it cool for up to two hours. Many brands have zero-waste options in the works, such as edible rice paper food wrappers and packaging that washes away in water.

Second life

Packaging with dual uses resonates with the environmentally conscious and the budget conscious alike by reducing waste and giving the customer two products in one. A Dutch company sells lightbulbs whose packaging can turn into a lampshade. Lu, the French biscuit brand, has introduced a box that becomes a child’s toy when refolded.

Pure and simple

Customers today want to know where their food comes from and what ingredients go into it. To meet this demand, food brands are rolling out packaging that communicates simplicity, purity, and natural origins. Beautifully photographed, fresh-looking ingredients are gracing packages on nearly every grocery shelf. Target’s Simply Balanced private label uses a circle graphic paired with appealing food photography on a field of turquoise. Pillsbury’s Simply line is clothed in a white package with no-nonsense typography and product imagery. Natural hues and unbleached papers combined with pops of vibrant color are being used to show flavor variety, as with Triscuit’s bright accents reminiscent of colors used in fashion and home décor.

Beauty to go

In 2014 we’ll see on-the-go packaging move into the beauty category. Sample sizes not only fit perfectly in a travel bag or purse, but are a great inducement to try a new luxury item. Sephora is taking advantage of the latter opportunity by including trial-size products with purchases. Offering samples at checkout is a smart targeting move—with freebies given only to those who have already shown an interest in high-end beauty.

Celebrity co-branding

More and more brands are adding cachet to their lines through the name recognition of artists and designers. Target is well known for partnering with major fashion designers including Phillip Lim, Alexander McQueen, and Jason Wu. Sephora recently collaborated with Pantone and Disney; Jarden Consumer Solutions (parent to Oster and Sunbeam brands) enlisted French Bull to design a line of small appliances. Commemorative Andy Warhol designs have appeared on Perrier, Nars, and Campbell’s soup packaging this year.”

By Kristina de Verdier on 26 November, 2013 In ,