Bolt Threads x Stella Mc Cartney

Stella McCartney continues the brand’s dedication to fashion eco innovation with the announcement of a new partnership with Bolt Threads, a San Fransisco-based biotechnology company creating the next generation of advanced materials.

This new collaboration will push boundaries in fabric innovation and usher in the next generation of cutting-edge textiles. Bolt Threads engineers fibers from scratch based on proteins found in nature, and then develops cleaner, closed-loop processes for manufacturing, using green chemistry practices.  Exemplified in the collaboration with Stella McCartney, Bolt Threads is able to create silk using yeast, making the textile vegan-friendly; staying true to the designer’s vegetarian philosophy. Solution oriented, this process reduces pollution, creates long-term sustainability, and always remains cruelty-free.

The material is the result of seven years of research and design in a lab. At the molecular level it is spider silk made by human hands. A big team of scientists, engineers, technicians and designers, have developed a way to closely mimic silk created in nature by producing a fiber from corn syrup that was fed to a yeast fermentation. Once the protein is harvested and purified into a powder, it is wet spun into fibres and twisted into yarns.

The first piece from the partnership will be a one-off gold dress made from Bolt Threads’ signature “spider silk”. It will feature in an upcoming exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art called Items: Is Fashion Modern?

Packaging from milk protein

The French start-up company Laptops has created a water soluble and biodegradable thermoplastic pellets based on milk protein

The French start-up company Lactips started in 2014 with the purpose to tackle the problem of environmental waste. In order to do this they produce water soluble and biodegradable thermoplastic pellets based on milk protein. Those pellets are used as a raw material for thermoforming, film, or any kind of plastic applications. You have probably seen their soluble film for dish detergent, which is fully integrated with the product – there is no need for the consumer to remove the packaging. So now the company has taken another exciting step in the global packaging development. They have developed an edible plastic packaging for the food industry, created from milk protein (casein).

Hinoki by Nine

Hinoki is a beautiful sustainable packaging concept created for the cosmetics industry. It’s designed by Swedish innovation agency NINE. NINE is a future-driven innovation consultancy, part of the BillerudKorsnäs Group, a publicly traded company and global provider of smarter packaging for a sustainable future. CHALLENGE: In the Cosmetics Industry, the notion of  “premium” products is commonly connected to…

Hinoki is a beautiful sustainable packaging concept created for the cosmetics industry. It’s designed by Swedish innovation agency NINE. NINE is a future-driven innovation consultancy, part of the BillerudKorsnäs Group, a publicly traded company and global provider of smarter packaging for a sustainable future.

CHALLENGE: In the Cosmetics Industry, the notion of  “premium” products is commonly connected to the “little extras” on the packaging. Many times, this extra packaging is not entirely necessary and only used during a limited time and then simply discarded. For Hinoki, we wanted to create a sustainable packaging range that is premium, respectful to the planet and a true game-changer in the world of packaging.

SOLUTION: Hinoki is a range of travel-size packaging made out of biodegradable paper for organic skin care products. It’s a concept based on simplicity, single-origin, and respect for the renewable material applied to a currently quite un-sustainable packaging category. The structural design of Hinoki is inspired by the form-language of origami as a means of being true to the value of the material. Each container uses a single piece of laminated paper, folded and pressed into shape, with a tear-off corner revealing a Hinoki wood twist cap.

RESULT: The result is a tactile and natural skin care range with premium value, coming not from artificial inflation, but rather an honest representation and respect for the value of both packaging materials and product experience. The concept is based on existing material and technology. It is currently in the process of being up-scaled. NINE together with Billerud Korsnäs will invite one brand owner partner, in a first mover ambition to develop concepts together with us for sustainable solutions projected to be on the market within 24-36 months.

New material – Paptic

Andrew Dent, vice president of library and materials research at Material ConneXion presents 11 exciting new materials designers should watch, for the web magazine Fast Company. Blurring the line between paper and plastic, Paptic is a new material that is easy to print on, easy to recycle, and perfect for packaging. “It might not change…

paptic-innovative-packaging-material

Andrew Dent, vice president of library and materials research at Material ConneXion presents 11 exciting new materials designers should watch, for the web magazine Fast Company. Blurring the line between paper and plastic, Paptic is a new material that is easy to print on, easy to recycle, and perfect for packaging. “It might not change the world,” Dent admits, but he thinks we’ll soon start seeing it everywhere, because while it feels and looks like paper, it’s as strong and tear-proof as plastic. Check out the other 10 materials here.

London Bio Packaging

London Bio Packaging supplies biodegradable or recycled packaging and eco cleaning products to the food and catering industry. Good website, not so common in this industry.

London Bio Packaging supplies biodegradable or recycled packaging and eco cleaning products to the food and catering industry. Good website, not so common in this industry.

Plastic Bottle Sail boat

It took four months to sail a boat made of discarded plastic bottles from San Francisco to Australia. The catamaran was built with 12,500 recycled plastic bottles and a fully recyclable plastic material called Seretex and held together with organic glue made from cashew-nut husks and sugarcane. The bottles were packed into the Plastiki’s pontoons…

It took four months to sail a boat made of discarded plastic bottles from San Francisco to Australia. The catamaran was built with 12,500 recycled plastic bottles and a fully recyclable plastic material called Seretex and held together with organic glue made from cashew-nut husks and sugarcane. The bottles were packed into the Plastiki’s pontoons in a pomegranate-like structure, giving the boat 68% of its buoyancy. Rothschild’s mission to change the public’s perception of plastic continues as his team brainstorms new ways to reuse the commonly discarded material in everything from surfboards to wind turbines. Every year people are throwing away tons of waste, that can actually be used as building material. Via Time who just rewarded the 50 best inventions of 2010.

Stretchable Paper

FibreForm – a packaging paper that can replace plastic where it was previously impossible. “The potential for creating unique packaging solutions is enormous. Never before has there been a similar paper on the market”, says Peter Bergström, Product Area Manager, and responsible for the development project of Billerud FibreForm. The high stretchability of the paper means that it can be formed. And with a stretchability of up…

FibreForm – a packaging paper that can replace plastic where it was previously impossible. “The potential for creating unique packaging solutions is enormous. Never before has there been a similar paper on the market”, says Peter Bergström, Product Area Manager, and responsible for the development project of Billerud FibreForm. The high stretchability of the paper means that it can be formed. And with a stretchability of up to 20 per cent, FibreForm breaks records. The normal stretchability of paper is usually between 2 and 4 per cent. Some sack papers can reach up to 7 per cent. Fibreform offers new opportunities for packaging solutions such as deep-drawn trays. “FibreForm can be converted in normal thermoforming machines without any major investments being required so it’s perfect for food products. It is also possible to make really deep embossings, something that has previously been impossible on paper”, says Peter Bergström. Read more here

Coffee Cup Contest

58 billion paper coffee cups are thrown away, unrecycled, each year. The BetaCup Challenge – is asking designers to invent a mean to dramatically reduce the wastage resulting from unrecyclable paper coffee cups. Here are two of the ideas; Coffee to grow and 100% recyclable Une Coffee Cup. See more of the most promising ideas here

58 billion paper coffee cups are thrown away, unrecycled, each year. The BetaCup Challenge – is asking designers to invent a mean to dramatically reduce the wastage resulting from unrecyclable paper coffee cups. Here are two of the ideas; Coffee to grow and 100% recyclable Une Coffee Cup. See more of the most promising ideas here

Moulded Fiber Jug

A moulded fiber milk jug from Ecologic. It’s made from 100% molded pulp with an inner plastic pouch that is making its commercial debut in the milk aisle. More info on Greener Package.

A moulded fiber milk jug from Ecologic. It’s made from 100% molded pulp with an inner plastic pouch that is making its commercial debut in the milk aisle. More info on Greener Package.

Bone Project – Ethical Defendable?

What’s this? Bone? This looks cruel. But as a matter of fact we have these rest products around the globe. And Andrew Ross – a creative soul has done an extensive project about how we could deal with it. The Bone Project has discovered ways to use bone when it’s a waste material. Research was divided between three different areas: perception, properties…

What’s this? Bone? This looks cruel. But as a matter of fact we have these rest products around the globe. And Andrew Ross – a creative soul has done an extensive project about how we could deal with it. The Bone Project has discovered ways to use bone when it’s a waste material. Research was divided between three different areas: perception, properties and fabrication. I would personally like to see more answers around perception; how ethical defendable is this? Would people accept it as they accept leather or red meat? Is leather and meat getting less and less accepted and this would be a step backwards? He developed a whole portfolio of products and during the process he also discovered that bone possesses unique chemical properties. Existing research proposes that ground bone can be used to remediate soil contaminated with heavy metals.  However, it should be possible to use whole bone to absorb the toxins released by electronic products, and batteries, upon their disposal. Therefore he designed this battery capsule.

Wine in PET?

Boisset introduces Fog Mountain Merlot in a 1-L PET bottle. I recommend you to read through the article on Greener Package. You will see some statements about sustainability, which as always will give you different answers depending on who you ask. Boisset in this case, claims that the PET bottles have a smaller carbon footprint…

Boisset introduces Fog Mountain Merlot in a 1-L PET bottle. I recommend you to read through the article on Greener Package. You will see some statements about sustainability, which as always will give you different answers depending on who you ask. Boisset in this case, claims that the PET bottles have a smaller carbon footprint than comparable glass bottles and require less energy to produce, ship, and recycle. A big driver for these companies is of course cost – amount of material – which in many cases also drives environmental impact. A 1-L Fog Mountain Merlot PET bottle contains 33% more wine than a standard 750-mL glass bottle, even though the two bottles are similar in physical size. Interesting! I have always found it so interesting that the icon of a traditional wine bottle is so strong, that even if new technologies enable more efficient distribution – it’s hard to make a change. Consumers have a strong power whether this will be a success or not.

Greenbox

Ecolect is a great site for green materials. They have initiated a service called Greenbox, which is great too! You sign up (pay $849.95) and every 3 months, you get a collection of 8-12 cutting-edge materials, shipped direct to you. Innovative and environmentally friendly material – ideal for design, engineering, and marketing teams. The samples…

Ecolect is a great site for green materials. They have initiated a service called Greenbox, which is great too! You sign up (pay $849.95) and every 3 months, you get a collection of 8-12 cutting-edge materials, shipped direct to you. Innovative and environmentally friendly material – ideal for design, engineering, and marketing teams. The samples will highlight trends that other material producers are setting, and serve as inspirational and informational reference for people working with product development.

Little Bug

Little Bug, founded in 2006, is a baby food producer in California. They are only using local, seasonal and organic ingredients. In the packaging development they were looking into safety, environmental impact and freezer functionality. They first tried out a biodegradable material, but realized quite soon that it will crack and shatter in the freezer….

Little Bug, founded in 2006, is a baby food producer in California. They are only using local, seasonal and organic ingredients. In the packaging development they were looking into safety, environmental impact and freezer functionality. They first tried out a biodegradable material, but realized quite soon that it will crack and shatter in the freezer. They checked paper, but it would leak meanwhile glass would be too heavy in transportation. So after all the decision was PP, a number 5 recyclable plastic. The outer box is made of paper.

Not a paper cup

Looks like paper cups, right. These are actually made of ceramic. London designer Anya Hindmarch designed the coffee cup and the idea was to create a reusable package and prevent cheap plastic packaging from contributing to landfills…and probably provoke a little with this “look-a-like”. The cup is like a thermos, it’s double-walled, so you can…

Looks like paper cups, right. These are actually made of ceramic. London designer Anya Hindmarch designed the coffee cup and the idea was to create a reusable package and prevent cheap plastic packaging from contributing to landfills…and probably provoke a little with this “look-a-like”. The cup is like a thermos, it’s double-walled, so you can fill the walls with hot water and keep it warm longer. Seletti is doing similar things with their fantastic design, questioning standards, using icons of disposable packaging and making something beautiful and sustainable with it.

Banana Leaves as Packaging Material

´ This wonderful concept is made for Designboom’s competition “Dining in 2015”, by Israeli designer Tal Marco. Not only it´s a renewable resource. Also the banana leaves have good properties for the food industry, it has a waxlike surface which is perfect for wet and greasy stuff. A flexible material so it can be folded…

´

This wonderful concept is made for Designboom’s competition “Dining in 2015”, by Israeli designer Tal Marco. Not only it´s a renewable resource. Also the banana leaves have good properties for the food industry, it has a waxlike surface which is perfect for wet and greasy stuff. A flexible material so it can be folded in many different ways. Easy to open, you simply tear it open along the natural perforations.

By Kristina de Verdier on 4 December, 2008 In , , , , ,