Water bottle made of algae by Ari Jansson from Iceland

People throw away billions of plastic bottles every year and that’s a problem because it takes plastic around 450 years to decompose, which is kind of a long time. Ari Jónsson is a product design student who studies at the Icelandic Academy of Arts. Recently he came up with a way to create a completely biodegradable water…

People throw away billions of plastic bottles every year and that’s a problem because it takes plastic around 450 years to decompose, which is kind of a long time. Ari Jónsson is a product design student who studies at the Icelandic Academy of Arts. Recently he came up with a way to create a completely biodegradable water bottle using red algae powder. The substance can be formed into a bottle by adding water, heat, placing the resulting jelly into a mold and then putting the mold into a freezer. “What makes this mix of algae and water an interesting solution is the lifespan of the bottle,” says Ari Jónsson, a product design student at Iceland Academy of the Arts, who created the experimental bottle. “It needs to contain liquid to keep its shape and as soon as it’s empty it will start to decompose.” Ari Jónsson exhibited his biodegradable bottle at a design festival in Reykjavik earlier this month.

Circular Economy of Packaging

Sofia Erixson has been digging into the circular economy thinking, and deals with what it means to the world of packaging.

We need to rethink the concept of waste! In the future we are all facing a growing population and increasing pressure on natural resources due to the ever-increasing demand for consumer goods. Therefore we need a more sustainable growth. This creates demands on businesses to use materials more efficiently and it requires major changes, new resource-efficient business models and an economy based on a sustainable society.

The answer is Circular Economy; the end goal of what used to be called closed loop recycling – genuinely enabling the renewal of existing resources, rather than continuing the need for new ones.

Packaging plays a positive role in a Circular Economy by optimising resource use, minimising product waste and protecting products through the value chains.

What will the future bring?

1. Sustainable online shopping
Online shopping increases every year. I think we need to create a more sustainable return policy of packaging material. A good example: RePack; Your returnable and reusable packaging. ”Simply return me and I will reward you.” Not only sustainable but also a smart way that also creates deeper customer relationships.

2. Food waste
Each year 1.3 billion tonnes of food, about a third of everything that is produced, is wasted. That means that 30% of the world’s agricultural land area is used to produce food that will be wasted. To reduce waste a Swedish company called Allwin take care of the leftovers from the food stores in Sweden and give it to people in need.

3. Sharing economy & Collaborative consumption
Sharing economy have become increasingly popular in the past couple of The power of the internet, together with social media exchange platforms are rapidly transforming industries by collaborative consumption. It has made it possible for people to rent and sell assets and transportation services through Uber and Airbnb, that were previously virtually unmarketable. Now you can also Airdine; make your home a restaurant, or book a transportation through Farwell; that match your request and at the same time decrease the empty space in the containers.

4. Recycling 2.0
Innovation in recycling technology is rapidly evolving and enabling production of high-quality products with great sustainability performance. For example, Starbucks is aiming to turn its waste coffee grounds and food into everyday products by using bacteria which can then be used in for an example bio-plastics and medicines.

To make Circular Economy a reality we need to work together. Policymakers and consumers play a central role. Most important to remember is that it is possible to rethink how we make and use things for sustainable business, we make this a reality together!

By Sofia Erixson on 28 February, 2016 In , ,

Meon by Beatrice Menis & Anna Johansson

Designed by Beatrice Menis & Anna Johansson. This project was born from a one-day-only creative exercise. The idea was to keep it as creative as possible in a short amount of time; we had to come up with a concept and bring it to live: that’s how Meon was born. What is Meon? It’s a brand for neon…

Designed by Beatrice Menis Anna Johansson. This project was born from a one-day-only creative exercise. The idea was to keep it as creative as possible in a short amount of time; we had to come up with a concept and bring it to live: that’s how Meon was born. What is Meon? It’s a brand for neon colour hair dyes.

Nowadays the market is full of crazy hair dyes, from shocking pink to dreamy turquoise, but the packaging is lacking personality, definitely not reflecting the bold individual buying the product. This is the reason why we’ve decided to turn things around and create Meon, a packaging that would truly reflect the personality of the product inside!

The naming “Meon” derives from neon; we’ve added the “me” in front of it which reflects the personality of the brand and of the consumer. It’s all about crafting your own identity through your own image, so we thought that creating a brand name that would directly talked to consumers was an effective way of communication.

The Meon range comes in four neon colours; acid green, fairy blue, polly pink and hot orange. Each colour comes with an adjective that describes both the colour and the personality of the consumer buying it. The colour personalities are supported by a sentence on the packaging; for example the “Acid Green” colour comes along with the sentence “Stay Wild”. Last but not least the outer packaging warns that this product is “not for cowards” provoking the consumers buying it.

By Kristina de Verdier on 10 November, 2015 In , , ,

Seedlip by Pearlfisher

The world’s first distilled non-alcoholic spirit. Inspired by the art of nature, Pearlfisher crafted a design language that reimagines the distillation of natural ingredients, informed by herbal remedies of the 17th century. “In a drinks market saturated by sugary soft drinks and a bevy of alcoholic offerings, Seedlip is the first brand of its kind…

The world’s first distilled non-alcoholic spirit. Inspired by the art of nature, Pearlfisher crafted a design language that reimagines the distillation of natural ingredients, informed by herbal remedies of the 17th century.

“In a drinks market saturated by sugary soft drinks and a bevy of alcoholic offerings, Seedlip is the first brand of its kind – a sophisticated and craft driven spirit that is also non-alcoholic. Pearlfisher Design brought the revolutionary new brand to life by combining process and ingredients in an illustrative way. Utilizing an artful arrangement of Seedlip’s own botanicals, a distinct monogram and copper detailing, Pearlfisher has infused Seedlip with layers of discovery, ensuring that the brand will become a covetable bar essential for both bartenders and adults who’d prefer a non-alcoholic option.

Yoga and beer?

Lululemon is creating a craft beer. The yoga pants maker has revealed a new brew called Curiosity Lager. The company collaborated with Stanley Park Brewing to create the limited-release lager. It is the official beer of SeaWheeze, a half-marathon and festival that blends music, running and yoga held in Vancouver in August. The lager features chinook and lemon drop hops. It will be available in B.C. and Alberta…

Curiosity-Lager-yoga beer lululemon packaging design

Lululemon is creating a craft beer. The yoga pants maker has revealed a new brew called Curiosity Lager. The company collaborated with Stanley Park Brewing to create the limited-release lager. It is the official beer of SeaWheeze, a half-marathon and festival that blends music, running and yoga held in Vancouver in August. The lager features chinook and lemon drop hops. It will be available in B.C. and Alberta into the fall. The company has been posting playful comments online, calling the beer “a refreshing reward for the end of a sweat session,” and “beer, it’s the new yoga pant.” Via Global News.

By Kristina de Verdier on 7 September, 2015 In , , , , , ,

Absolut Craft

Designed by No Picnic in cooperation with The Brand Union. And nominated to the German Design Award 2015. “The original ABSOLUT bottle was inspired by a Swedish apothecary bottle, now one of the most recognizable bottles in the world and the most portrayed in art. Retaining this iconic silhouette, ABSOLUT CRAFT reflects the brand’s heritage…

Designed by No Picnic in cooperation with The Brand Union. And nominated to the German Design Award 2015. “The original ABSOLUT bottle was inspired by a Swedish apothecary bottle, now one of the most recognizable bottles in the world and the most portrayed in art. Retaining this iconic silhouette, ABSOLUT CRAFT reflects the brand’s heritage by featuring the alchemic symbol for distillation. The color coating is inspired by 17th century apothecary jars and protects natural ingredients.”

Olivae Olive Oil

Olive oil packaging designed by student Kenny Maicon Barcelos, Brazil. Via Packaging of the World

Olive oil packaging designed by student Kenny Maicon Barcelos, Brazil. Via Packaging of the World

Beijing 8

Brand identity and packaging for a Chinese restaurant, designed by Stockholm based Garbergs Project. Beijing8 is a dumplings & tea restaurant chain for slow fast food with an organic state of mind. The design agency explains the idea as a combination of a simplistic scandinavian and colourful Chinese style. And they have been using clever and cost-efficient  packaging…

Brand identity and packaging for a Chinese restaurant, designed by Stockholm based Garbergs ProjectBeijing8 is a dumplings & tea restaurant chain for slow fast food with an organic state of mind. The design agency explains the idea as a combination of a simplistic scandinavian and colourful Chinese style. And they have been using clever and cost-efficient  packaging solutions.

Christmas Honey by Helt

Christmas edition of the Helt honey, to be ordered online, and you can also find it at the wonderful food market Torvehallerne in Copenhagen. “Helt was founded in 2012 by Anthony Lee, a passionate beekeeper and honey lover. Anthony had moved to Denmark four years earlier, after meeting a Danish girl and dropping everything in England to head over the water…

Christmas edition of the Helt honey, to be ordered online, and you can also find it at the wonderful food market Torvehallerne in Copenhagen. “Helt was founded in 2012 by Anthony Lee, a passionate beekeeper and honey lover. Anthony had moved to Denmark four years earlier, after meeting a Danish girl and dropping everything in England to head over the water to be with her. At the time of moving, there were no jobs for Anthony because he couldn’t speak Danish. So he sat around for a while thinking it over, and eventually decided that beekeeping might be for him. Helt is hand-crafted Danish honey infused with love for bees and nature. That’s what Helt is all about really. Working the precious honey in small batches is the traditional and cosy way to do things.”

Happy Eggs – Student Work

The Happy Eggs packaging for organic eggs. Designed by Maja Szczypek, a student based in Warsaw, Poland. The packaging design is supposed to make the customer feel that what they have before them is 100% natural. It promotes the use of organic materials and sustainability in production. Maja explains “The hay drawpiece is cheap and easy in…

The Happy Eggs packaging for organic eggs. Designed by Maja Szczypek, a student based in Warsaw, Poland. The packaging design is supposed to make the customer feel that what they have before them is 100% natural. It promotes the use of organic materials and sustainability in production. Maja explains “The hay drawpiece is cheap and easy in production. It is made with heateded press, out of widely available material.” The project made it to the final of make me! 2013 contest.

Simply Chocolate from Copenhagen

Simply Chocolate is based in Copenhagen. “Up here it’s too cold to grow cocoa beans. But it´s hot enough to have a love affair with great chocolate. Copenhagen is a very old city with a highly vibrating pulse and plenty of room to nurture a new kind of chocolate. Since we began in 2011, a lot…

Simply Chocolate is based in Copenhagen. “Up here it’s too cold to grow cocoa beans. But it´s hot enough to have a love affair with great chocolate. Copenhagen is a very old city with a highly vibrating pulse and plenty of room to nurture a new kind of chocolate. Since we began in 2011, a lot of people have shared our desire. Not just for what we do, but apparently also for how we do it. We appreciate that.

Simply Chocolate only uses the finest raw chocolate on the market and the best natural ingredients. We use the best of nuts, grains and berries. Like almonds, hazelnuts, and pecans. Spelt flakes and oatmeal. And, finally, cranberries, goji berries, coconut, bluberries, you name it. On top of that, we spice it up with liquorice, vanilla, cinnamon, chili, ginger and other wonders of nature.”

Hand Crafted Chocolate from Iceland

Truly beautiful packaging design from Omnom Chocolate, hand crafted chocolate from Iceland. Each flavour is represented by a faceted animal.

Truly beautiful packaging design from Omnom Chocolate, hand crafted chocolate from Iceland. Each flavour is represented by a faceted animal.

By Kristina de Verdier on 14 November, 2013 In , , , ,

Coca Cola Packaging Innovations

Coca-Cola  just released two new packaging projects, the Chill Activated Can and Sixer. The Chill Activated Can allows the consumer to see how cold their Coca-Cola is by displaying a graphic of ice cubes when chilled. The Sixer box saves the consumer space by storing vertically or horizontally in their fridge. Two great innovative packages…

Coca-Cola  just released two new packaging projects, the Chill Activated Can and Sixer. The Chill Activated Can allows the consumer to see how cold their Coca-Cola is by displaying a graphic of ice cubes when chilled. The Sixer box saves the consumer space by storing vertically or horizontally in their fridge. Two great innovative packages for Coca-Cola fanatics

Russian Dairy Packaging

Нюрка пришла! (Nyurka came!). A line of Russian natural dairy products. Simple and clean using just two colours, which makes the packaging easy for production and visible on the shelf. Designed by Viewpoint

Нюрка пришла! (Nyurka came!). A line of Russian natural dairy products. Simple and clean using just two colours, which makes the packaging easy for production and visible on the shelf. Designed by Viewpoint

By Kristina de Verdier on 11 November, 2013 In , , , ,

Paper Wine Bottle

Paperboy, a wine bottle made out of compressed recycled paper. “Paperboy is about as green as it’s possible to make a wine bottle. It’s made out of a compressed recycled paper, printed with natural inks and the inside contains a recyclable sleeve like you find in a box of wine.  The bottles are rigid and strong…

Paperboy, a wine bottle made out of compressed recycled paper. “Paperboy is about as green as it’s possible to make a wine bottle. It’s made out of a compressed recycled paper, printed with natural inks and the inside contains a recyclable sleeve like you find in a box of wine.  The bottles are rigid and strong – they’re even ice bucket safe for three hours – and take only 15% of the energy that regular glass bottles take to produce. They weigh only an ounce when empty so save a huge amount of energy on shipping. In Safeway now and available nationwide soon.” By Stranger & Stranger