Cocot plant-based foods

A whole-food, plant-based diet is centered on whole, unrefined or minimally refined plants. It’s a diet based on fruits, vegetables, tubers, whole grains and legumes and it excludes or minimises meat. Have a look at these beautifully designed plants-based products.

    Inspired by cow blotches and colors of the earth and nature. These products are aimed at a selected audience of vegans who take care of the environment and their health. For the logo, a simple and geometric typeface was selected that made a contrast with the rusticity of the spots. A series of iconographies were designed that refer to times when man was fed only with natural products. Their approach with clean, sans-serif typography gives Cocot a luxurious feel mostly associated with high-end fashion brands. Designed by Mamba Studio.

By Kristina de Verdier on 29 May, 2018 In ,

Cocofloss making flossing a fun experience

Cocofloss is a California based company making flossing a fun and rewarding experience. Mexico-based Anagrama has used vivid pastel based colors and metallic foil to give a holographic finish that enhances its lively and clean nature.

Cocofloss is a California based company making flossing a fun and rewarding experience. Mexico-based Anagrama has been designing awesome stuff again. This is how they explain their work for Cocofloss: “They offer a great variety of dental floss with a preoccupation for design. The graphic syntax developed for this project displays Cocofloss amusing essence within the interplay created by the various present elements. The pastel based colors alludes to the brand’s main values, diverting from the already age-worn clinical white more common for all things oral care. This was then matched with an elegant logo composition creating a more refined character. The metallic foil gives the whole aesthetic a holographic finish that enhances its lively and clean nature.” Via The Dieline.

By Kristina de Verdier on 3 April, 2018 In , , ,

4 Sustainable Design Principles

Nowadays sustainability is an integral part of most development projects, a filter all new designs should go through. Sustainability is part of what we call “good design” and everyone is responsible – it’s a cross-functional mission. Here are 4 design principles that can help us in these efforts.

Several aspects influence the sustainability of a product or service and it’s not easy to define which development activities to focus on, to create the best possible impact on our planet. What is clear though, is that design based on human needs, is the best starting point for sustainable design. John Thackara, author and one of the most influential voices within sustainability, states that we are filling our world with stuff, but we forget to ask ourselves “What are these things for” “What value do they add to our lives” Sometimes we focus blindly on new technology, while we probably should look into which problems to solve first. A designer’s most important role is to define these needs and make the new offering relevant and intuitive to the user.

#1 LESS IS FUTURE

We live in a world where we are constantly occupied; stores, web-sites, homes are filled with options – people are over-whelmed! A crucial task is therefore to simplify. Simplifying a product or service may sound easy, but achieving it in a meaningful way, is complex. “Less-ness” can as well be to create products with better quality, which creates less hustle for consumers as well as for the environment! Let’s ask ourselves how we can simplify the right way through the entire value chain. How can we use less material, or rather how can we minimise the amount of material that needs to be wasted?

Example: A team of MIT Media Lab researchers has developed inflated origami. A network of air channels in geometric patterns on sheets of paper, plastic, or textile.

#2 FOCUS ON THE EXPERIENCE

People do not think of a product, brand or communication separately – People buy an experience. Which means we must design for the holistic experiences. If we focus on the needs that should be solved, instead of how products look today, it results in a better user experience and increases the potential of more sustainable products. Perhaps parts of the need can be solved digitally with less footprint? When we focus on the holistic experience we have the opportunity to integrate more and eliminate useless fuzz that might just be there as a heritage from the past.

Example: IKEA’s iconic bags are famous for being reused for the most fantastic purposes, in people’s everyday lives. Now re-designed by Hay and even more desired.

#3 CIRCULAR CHOICES

Material choice is often a big question in development activities. Again, there are no simple answers regarding sustainability and material choice. But there are some basic guidelines to follow. How can we minimize the amount of different materials? How can we increase the proportion of materials made from renewable sources? How can we think circularly, think along the whole value chain, consider recycling, change the view of waste? A circular economy aims to maintain products, components and materials to its highest benefit and value all the time. Last but not least, how can we help consumers to understand what material it is, which increases the chances that it’s handled and recycled correctly.

Example: Lego’s botanical elements such as leaves, bushes and trees will be made from plant-based plastic sourced from sugarcane in the future and will appear in LEGO boxes already in 2018

#4 SHARING & CARING

It’s getting more and more accepted for consumers to have access to things instead of owning them, especially for the younger generation. The big difference companies make when creating a product as part of the sharing economy, is that instead of asking “what should we create” the question is “how can we deliver on this need”. The sharing economy is about being in a broader context than just “my company”. My products should not only cater to my own needs, but they will contribute / be part of a much larger system.

Example: Care by Volvo is a new alternative to owning or leasing a Volvo car. Volvo calls it the future of the car experience, where a simple monthly subscription is all you need and you can easily share the car through a digital key.

Inné – A Tactile Fragrance Concept

“As you awaken to your divine nature, you’ll begin to appreciate beauty in everything you see, touch and experience.” Wayne Dyer. 

The INNÉ’s fragrance concept, designed by Thitipol Chaimattayompol. A concept which ties nicely to our earlier post about Touching Realities. Touch is one of the most important sensory modality in driving consumer behavior. The increasing lack of texture in people’s lives makes experiences become one-dimensional. So now, smart brands have be focusing more on how their products feel! By elevating the details and integrating elements of tactility, companies will consequently need to have a clear strategy on the tactile components of their brand.

“The INNÉ brand conveys a simple daylight lifestyle, while the bottle has the more complex design that links to sophisticated personality. The outer character looks simple as an ordinary individual, after touching and experiencing with the fragrance scent will evoke the inner personality to become more sensitive. The beauty is in detail of senses. The intricate texture on the bottle evokes the new personality which more complicated. The design has incorporated the touch sensation on the bottle’s surface.”

By Kristina de Verdier on 21 March, 2018 In , ,

Health Wearables by L’Oreal & Fuseproject

Beauty Tech is a huge space that hasn’t been explored much. L’Oréal’s Technology Incubator has teamed up with Fuseproject to develop two UV wearable sensors, aiming to make sunbathing healthier for people.

A ‘UV wearable’ is a stick-on sensor that tracks sun exposure, lowering the risk of skin cancer by raising personal awareness around how much sun is too much. L’Oreal’s technology incubator teamed up with Fuseproject to create the first product, My UV Patch launched in 2016. Now the next product is being launched, called UV Sense. UV Sense is the world’s first battery-free UV wearable, connecting to an app where personalised information and advice on sun exposure can be easily accessed.

My UV Patch is comprised of a series of tiles with photoreactive dyes that respond to UV rays, set against neutral reference points. Fuseproject was challenged to design a patch that followed these technical constrains, while designing new styles as body ornaments. By challenging the technical elements and shrinking them, we developed an aesthetic that could be directed into any number of stylistic collections. Working around the hand, arm, and wrist, we established a core collection that truly marries fashion with function; the My UV Patch redesign is sophisticated and discreet, a take on modern jewelry, with bold architecture and tonality.

UV Sense is an even smaller, dome-based sensor, that fits directly on a thumbnail, or an accessory like sunglasses. Subtle patterns laid directly over the outer shell create playful and iconic expressions similar to nail-art, with clear versions for those who prefer simplicity. A miniscule window in the shell allows for light to enter; data collected and stored is then transferred directly to the mobile app through an NFC chip

Electric off-road motorcycle

The Swedish company CAKE’s new invention Kalk, is a new kind of electric off-road motorbike, a combination of motorcycle and bicycle with electric drive.

The Swedish company CAKE’s new invention Kalk, is a new kind of electric off-road motorbike, a combination of motorcycle and bicycle with electric drive. CAKE’s mission is to speed up the journey towards a zero emission society, while enhancing excitement and fun. All components are made from scratch to optimize the riding performance in this new category. Every little detail is elaborated for perfection, while considering the perspectives of sustainability. The motorbikes are light and silent with a range of 50 miles.

 

Bolt Threads x Stella Mc Cartney

Stella McCartney continues the brand’s dedication to fashion eco innovation with the announcement of a new partnership with Bolt Threads, a San Fransisco-based biotechnology company creating the next generation of advanced materials.

This new collaboration will push boundaries in fabric innovation and usher in the next generation of cutting-edge textiles. Bolt Threads engineers fibers from scratch based on proteins found in nature, and then develops cleaner, closed-loop processes for manufacturing, using green chemistry practices.  Exemplified in the collaboration with Stella McCartney, Bolt Threads is able to create silk using yeast, making the textile vegan-friendly; staying true to the designer’s vegetarian philosophy. Solution oriented, this process reduces pollution, creates long-term sustainability, and always remains cruelty-free.

The material is the result of seven years of research and design in a lab. At the molecular level it is spider silk made by human hands. A big team of scientists, engineers, technicians and designers, have developed a way to closely mimic silk created in nature by producing a fiber from corn syrup that was fed to a yeast fermentation. Once the protein is harvested and purified into a powder, it is wet spun into fibres and twisted into yarns.

The first piece from the partnership will be a one-off gold dress made from Bolt Threads’ signature “spider silk”. It will feature in an upcoming exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art called Items: Is Fashion Modern?

Recycled Coffee Cups

James Cropper 3D Products has been appointed by Lush Fresh Handmade Cosmetics as part of the brand’s commitment to finding ethically sourced packaging.

lush sustainable packaging product design 2

Lush introduced packaging made from recycled coffee cups in October 2017. An advanced processing technique is being used, to separate the plastic and paper, press-molding the paper to create the packaging. The square clam-shell box design can store up to four of Lush’s solid bath-oil products.

By Kristina de Verdier on 15 November, 2017 In , , , ,

The Iris Collection by Hay

The Iris collection, a new series of vases, mugs and penholders in porcelain, designed by Clara von Zweigbergk for Hay. The collection is inspired by folding paper and the super thin porcelain of Anita Japan makes the series extremely strong while still looking fragile. 

Many of the products Clara von Zweigbergk has designed originate from her work with paper. “I have a big love for paper and folding it. I once had a colleague who named me the “paperholic”, he caught me far too often with a freshly shopped roll of paper. So appropriately, the Iris Collection stems from experimenting in folding rounded shapes in various paper weights. One shape led to another and quite soon there was around 20 pieces of paper objects, vases, pen holders and later mugs. The best ones are actually made out of the last sheets of a much-loved Japanese paper, in very unusual (for print) colours, bought in Tokyo.”

By Kristina de Verdier on 18 September, 2017 In , , , , ,

Inflated Origami By MIT

A team of MIT Media Lab researchers has developed inflated origami. A network of air channels in geometric patterns on sheets of paper, plastic, or textile. This creates inflatable pinched pouches which are subsequently connected and layered to take on complex folding forms.

MIT inflated origami packaging innovation

A computer program allows the designer to experiment and fine-tune shapes and patterns in a simulator. Once the desired response emerges digitally, the structure is fabricated. Via Frame.

Zlatan Myth Design

After launching two beloved fragrances, Zlatan Ibrahimović Parfums is releasing its third collection – MYTH WOOD and MYTH BLOOM. The scents capture the elusive magic of Zlatan’s home country – the forests, nature and calm of Sweden. Zlatan worked closely with Olivier Pescheux, one of the world’s leading perfumers from Givaudan in Paris.

zlatan-mth-packaging-design-11

After launching two beloved fragrances, Zlatan Ibrahimović Parfums is releasing its third collection – MYTH WOOD and MYTH BLOOM. The scents capture the elusive magic of Zlatan’s home country – the forests, nature and calm of Sweden. Zlatan worked closely with Olivier Pescheux, one of the world’s leading perfumers from Givaudan in Paris.

Mirage Arabica Coffee Concept

A team of Armenia-based designers have created a product in which each of them can find their favorite flavor of coffee (espresso, cappuccino, mocha, latte, americano). “We took coffee Arabica and visualized 5 types of coffee connecting them to each other. We decided to separate the ingredients by turning them into colors. Next, we illustrated them in a form…

A team of Armenia-based designers have created a product in which each of them can find their favorite flavor of coffee (espresso, cappuccino, mocha, latte, americano).

“We took coffee Arabica and visualized 5 types of coffee connecting them to each other. We decided to separate the ingredients by turning them into colors. Next, we illustrated them in a form of desert. We have solved the visualization issue of diverse types of coffee by transforming the desert landscape into corresponding color pieces. The coffee water was depicted in the form of clear blue sky, chocolate in the form of desert cliffs, milk in the form of light feathery clouds and foam milk in a more dense cloudy form. Camels and small oases betray an even bigger association of the desert. In order to show different types separately, we created a window. By rotating it you can find layers of particular coffee. The concept of desert itself became the inspiration of the name of packaging. Distorted layers and wet technique remind of desert mirage. Mirages are optical illusions that people experience out of severe need in desert. Applying this idea, we transformed it into a severe urge for drinking the coffee.”

RESULT

“We created flexible, bright and memorable packaging for Arabic coffee. The visual elements in the packaging highlight Arabian culture through the use of calligraphy, rhombuses, the window, and colors. As a result, the packaging becomes a window through which you can find your preferable coffee aroma in the desert. Spin it around, wander through the desert and find your flavour.”

CREDITS

Design: Karen Gevorgyan
Illustration: Armenak Grigoryan
Calligraphy: Maria Gevorgyan
Copywriting: Ani Gevorgyan
Photography: Arnos Martirosyan
By Kristina de Verdier on 9 May, 2017 In , ,

Packaging from milk protein

The French start-up company Laptops has created a water soluble and biodegradable thermoplastic pellets based on milk protein

The French start-up company Lactips started in 2014 with the purpose to tackle the problem of environmental waste. In order to do this they produce water soluble and biodegradable thermoplastic pellets based on milk protein. Those pellets are used as a raw material for thermoforming, film, or any kind of plastic applications. You have probably seen their soluble film for dish detergent, which is fully integrated with the product – there is no need for the consumer to remove the packaging. So now the company has taken another exciting step in the global packaging development. They have developed an edible plastic packaging for the food industry, created from milk protein (casein).

Hinoki by Nine

Hinoki is a beautiful sustainable packaging concept created for the cosmetics industry. It’s designed by Swedish innovation agency NINE. NINE is a future-driven innovation consultancy, part of the BillerudKorsnäs Group, a publicly traded company and global provider of smarter packaging for a sustainable future. CHALLENGE: In the Cosmetics Industry, the notion of  “premium” products is commonly connected to…

Hinoki is a beautiful sustainable packaging concept created for the cosmetics industry. It’s designed by Swedish innovation agency NINE. NINE is a future-driven innovation consultancy, part of the BillerudKorsnäs Group, a publicly traded company and global provider of smarter packaging for a sustainable future.

CHALLENGE: In the Cosmetics Industry, the notion of  “premium” products is commonly connected to the “little extras” on the packaging. Many times, this extra packaging is not entirely necessary and only used during a limited time and then simply discarded. For Hinoki, we wanted to create a sustainable packaging range that is premium, respectful to the planet and a true game-changer in the world of packaging.

SOLUTION: Hinoki is a range of travel-size packaging made out of biodegradable paper for organic skin care products. It’s a concept based on simplicity, single-origin, and respect for the renewable material applied to a currently quite un-sustainable packaging category. The structural design of Hinoki is inspired by the form-language of origami as a means of being true to the value of the material. Each container uses a single piece of laminated paper, folded and pressed into shape, with a tear-off corner revealing a Hinoki wood twist cap.

RESULT: The result is a tactile and natural skin care range with premium value, coming not from artificial inflation, but rather an honest representation and respect for the value of both packaging materials and product experience. The concept is based on existing material and technology. It is currently in the process of being up-scaled. NINE together with Billerud Korsnäs will invite one brand owner partner, in a first mover ambition to develop concepts together with us for sustainable solutions projected to be on the market within 24-36 months.

Compostable Coffee Pods

Halo is a completely bio-degradable coffee capsule compatible with your home Nespresso machine. Designed with an innovative blend of compostable natural fibres to protect the coffee flavours. Like many coffee drinkers across the world Halo was dissatisfied with the coffee capsule industries practices, vagueness and green washing. -13,500 non-biodegradable coffee capsules being thrown into landfill every minute. -39,000 coffee capsules globally…

Halo is a completely bio-degradable coffee capsule compatible with your home Nespresso machine. Designed with an innovative blend of compostable natural fibres to protect the coffee flavours. Like many coffee drinkers across the world Halo was dissatisfied with the coffee capsule industries practices, vagueness and green washing.

-13,500 non-biodegradable coffee capsules being thrown into landfill every minute.

-39,000 coffee capsules globally are produced every minute.

-Between 13,500 and 29,000 of these are sent to landfill.

-That’s over 20 billion capsules containing aluminium or plastic produced every year

-Circling the earth 14 times over

Aluminium and plastic coffee capsules are difficult and time consuming for people to recycle so most of them get thrown in the bin. Or they have to be sent for industrial composting which can be very difficult and expensive. Halo is made of entirely organic materials; Bamboo and paper pulp. “It’s not a cheap way of packaging coffee but it’s the right way.”