3D-printed Algae packaging

Designed by Martina Green. “One third of all plastic produced is used for packaging. Plastic has great packaging qualities, but there is an imbalance between the lifetime of products (hundreds of years) and the actual time of utilization (a few minutes). Plastic packaging generates large amounts of waste that never really disappear. The plastic
 will…

Alg förpackningsdesign 1

Designed by Martina Green. “One third of all plastic produced is used for packaging. Plastic has great packaging qualities, but there is an imbalance between the lifetime of products (hundreds of years) and the actual time of utilization (a few minutes). Plastic packaging generates large amounts of waste that never really disappear. The plastic
 will break into smaller and smaller pieces and cause problem in different ecosystems. Martina is a product designer focused on biodegradable materials. She graduated in Design MA 2014, at the university of Gothenburg. This July she presented 3D-printed algae packaging made from local kelp mixed with biodegradable polymer. The idea is to use algae as an alternative to non degradable plastic packaging. Algae has been used by mankind in ancient cultures, and today it’s harvested on a commercial scale, mostly in Asia. As a packaging material algae has many good qualities; it grows fast, breaks down quick and naturally, does not occupy land space and it is facilitating the growth of marine ecosystem. Martina’s Algae packaging can be used for different applications and the time of degradation can be adapted to required lifespan.”

Water bottle made of algae by Ari Jansson from Iceland

People throw away billions of plastic bottles every year and that’s a problem because it takes plastic around 450 years to decompose, which is kind of a long time. Ari Jónsson is a product design student who studies at the Icelandic Academy of Arts. Recently he came up with a way to create a completely biodegradable water…

People throw away billions of plastic bottles every year and that’s a problem because it takes plastic around 450 years to decompose, which is kind of a long time. Ari Jónsson is a product design student who studies at the Icelandic Academy of Arts. Recently he came up with a way to create a completely biodegradable water bottle using red algae powder. The substance can be formed into a bottle by adding water, heat, placing the resulting jelly into a mold and then putting the mold into a freezer. “What makes this mix of algae and water an interesting solution is the lifespan of the bottle,” says Ari Jónsson, a product design student at Iceland Academy of the Arts, who created the experimental bottle. “It needs to contain liquid to keep its shape and as soon as it’s empty it will start to decompose.” Ari Jónsson exhibited his biodegradable bottle at a design festival in Reykjavik earlier this month.