Packaging from milk protein

The French start-up company Laptops has created a water soluble and biodegradable thermoplastic pellets based on milk protein

The French start-up company Lactips started in 2014 with the purpose to tackle the problem of environmental waste. In order to do this they produce water soluble and biodegradable thermoplastic pellets based on milk protein. Those pellets are used as a raw material for thermoforming, film, or any kind of plastic applications. You have probably seen their soluble film for dish detergent, which is fully integrated with the product – there is no need for the consumer to remove the packaging. So now the company has taken another exciting step in the global packaging development. They have developed an edible plastic packaging for the food industry, created from milk protein (casein).

Hinoki by Nine

Hinoki is a beautiful sustainable packaging concept created for the cosmetics industry. It’s designed by Swedish innovation agency NINE. NINE is a future-driven innovation consultancy, part of the BillerudKorsnäs Group, a publicly traded company and global provider of smarter packaging for a sustainable future. CHALLENGE: In the Cosmetics Industry, the notion of  “premium” products is commonly connected to…

Hinoki is a beautiful sustainable packaging concept created for the cosmetics industry. It’s designed by Swedish innovation agency NINE. NINE is a future-driven innovation consultancy, part of the BillerudKorsnäs Group, a publicly traded company and global provider of smarter packaging for a sustainable future.

CHALLENGE: In the Cosmetics Industry, the notion of  “premium” products is commonly connected to the “little extras” on the packaging. Many times, this extra packaging is not entirely necessary and only used during a limited time and then simply discarded. For Hinoki, we wanted to create a sustainable packaging range that is premium, respectful to the planet and a true game-changer in the world of packaging.

SOLUTION: Hinoki is a range of travel-size packaging made out of biodegradable paper for organic skin care products. It’s a concept based on simplicity, single-origin, and respect for the renewable material applied to a currently quite un-sustainable packaging category. The structural design of Hinoki is inspired by the form-language of origami as a means of being true to the value of the material. Each container uses a single piece of laminated paper, folded and pressed into shape, with a tear-off corner revealing a Hinoki wood twist cap.

RESULT: The result is a tactile and natural skin care range with premium value, coming not from artificial inflation, but rather an honest representation and respect for the value of both packaging materials and product experience. The concept is based on existing material and technology. It is currently in the process of being up-scaled. NINE together with Billerud Korsnäs will invite one brand owner partner, in a first mover ambition to develop concepts together with us for sustainable solutions projected to be on the market within 24-36 months.

Make Smart Matter

Consumers are embracing the smartness which is seamlessly integrated in their reality. It is the marriage of technology and simplicity that will help brands connect with consumers in exceptional ways.

Amazon Go

Consumers can shop anytime, anywhere and are becoming increasingly demanding in terms of convenience. New technology integrated in consumers’ product experiences is only going to grow, advances in materials science, components are getting smaller. As this sector is quickly evolving in many areas, one thing is clear though; consumers and brand owners now want usable products, that adds real value to their lives, rather than short-term marketing gimmicks. How can smart components help prevent food waste, ensure product safety, generate and store meaningful data for medical purpose, or make the weekly shopping easier? Consumers are embracing the smartness which is seamlessly integrated in their reality. It is the marriage of technology and simplicity that will help brands connect with consumers in exceptional ways.

TO CONSIDER

-What real consumer problems needs to be solved?

-How can I create a seamless experience, integrated in consumers’ lifestyle?

-How can the solution be intuitive?

GOOD EXAMPLE

Amazon Go is a new kind of store with no checkout required. Amazon created the world’s most advanced shopping technology so you never have to wait in line. Use the Amazon Go app to enter the store, take the products you want, and go! Amazon uses sensors, video-technology and AI-algoritms to enable this convenient shopping experience.

By Kristina de Verdier on 24 March, 2017 In , , ,

Compostable Coffee Pods

Halo is a completely bio-degradable coffee capsule compatible with your home Nespresso machine. Designed with an innovative blend of compostable natural fibres to protect the coffee flavours. Like many coffee drinkers across the world Halo was dissatisfied with the coffee capsule industries practices, vagueness and green washing. -13,500 non-biodegradable coffee capsules being thrown into landfill every minute. -39,000 coffee capsules globally…

Halo is a completely bio-degradable coffee capsule compatible with your home Nespresso machine. Designed with an innovative blend of compostable natural fibres to protect the coffee flavours. Like many coffee drinkers across the world Halo was dissatisfied with the coffee capsule industries practices, vagueness and green washing.

-13,500 non-biodegradable coffee capsules being thrown into landfill every minute.

-39,000 coffee capsules globally are produced every minute.

-Between 13,500 and 29,000 of these are sent to landfill.

-That’s over 20 billion capsules containing aluminium or plastic produced every year

-Circling the earth 14 times over

Aluminium and plastic coffee capsules are difficult and time consuming for people to recycle so most of them get thrown in the bin. Or they have to be sent for industrial composting which can be very difficult and expensive. Halo is made of entirely organic materials; Bamboo and paper pulp. “It’s not a cheap way of packaging coffee but it’s the right way.”

And Union’s Beer Can go texture

Bavarian craft brewer AND UNION has unveiled the first canned beers, in textured aluminium cans.

“Bavarian craft brewer AND UNION has unveiled the first canned beers in its range with a  ballsy yet restrained design. Solid, single colours represent each beer in the line-up, in an attempt  to cut through the clutter commonly seen on shelves these days.”

“The  modest hero of the design is texture, as the brewer played with embossed geometric shapes to add depth to the  container  in the absence of typical craft beer aesthetics. By manipulating the surface of the  aluminium can, the design balances visual simplicity with detailed, tactile consideration to reflect the  malleable nature of the material.” Via The Dieline

By Kristina de Verdier on 3 March, 2017 In , , ,

Zara Fragrance Design

A design evolution of Zara’s “best seller”women’s fragrance range, designed by Lavernia & Cienfuegos. Zara wanted an updated look which their customers continue to recognise.

Designed by Lavernia & Cienfuegos. “Zara approached us to redesign their “best seller” women’s fragrance range. The brief asked that the new design be an evolution of the previous one, with the intention that customers continue to recognize the collection. They asked us to focus on the bottle and cap and to make very little changes to the box. Previously the bottle had a cube design with very pronounced edges, similar to other designs, which have become commonplace in the fragrance market. The cap was cylindrical. We started to work on square forms, but also looking for that ‘something’ to give it character. We rounded the edges, subtly curved the faces and we created a transitional join between the bottle shoulders and the cap to make it seem as a seamless continuation of the glass. We also gave the cap a square rounded shape. The result is a more feminine and smoother appearance than the previous design, which also transmits more quality because of its extra weight. There are seven fragrances in total that are divided into two groups . One group with clear glass and black caps. The other group containing the more sophisticated variants, with tinted glass in black, red or white.

By Kristina de Verdier on 15 February, 2017 In , , , , ,

Cosmetics concept created by Funky Business

Branding agency Funky Business® created new brand line concept of premium cosmetics. “Microme Cosmetics are innovative solution in the field of molecular makeup. Natural ingredients and the latest scientific developments allowed to create safe and effective solution for rejuvenating and skin protection. Product line consists of three well-developed positions helping to get a full range…

Branding agency Funky Business® created new brand line concept of premium cosmetics. “Microme Cosmetics are innovative solution in the field of molecular makeup. Natural ingredients and the latest scientific developments allowed to create safe and effective solution for rejuvenating and skin protection. Product line consists of three well-developed positions helping to get a full range of skin care products. Skin Protect — protection, Skin Care — Care, Skin Control — constant care. The main objective was to reflect company’s innovative approach to their products, natural ingredients, but not to make it in trivial way. We decided to look deeper and explore the basic ingredients of cosmetics under the microscope because its molecular properties give such effect. On the molecular level each object forms incredible patterns, so these patterns make up basis of packaging ideas. As a result, the decision was to use a tactile pattern formed by main ingredient of the product. High-quality paper and special printing technology made it possible not only to see but also feel the contents of the box.” Via Packaging of the World.

THE WORLD’S FIRST FLAT WINE BOTTLE

London entrepreneur Joe Revell of startup Garçon Wines has designed a plastic Bordeaux-style bottle that’s flattened like a flask so it can fit through an English letterbox for easy delivery to consumers. Garçon Wine club is a subscription service, offering people who want to try different types of wine, convenient home-delivery. Using a heavy duty, glass-like plastic, Garçon Wine club bottles…

London entrepreneur Joe Revell of startup Garçon Wines has designed a plastic Bordeaux-style bottle that’s flattened like a flask so it can fit through an English letterbox for easy delivery to consumers. Garçon Wine club is a subscription service, offering people who want to try different types of wine, convenient home-delivery. Using a heavy duty, glass-like plastic, Garçon Wine club bottles are thinner and longer than a typically-shaped bottle yet contain the same amount of wine. Packaged in special boxes, the bottles are specially designed to handle the stresses of traveling through the post and arriving inside the home unbroken. Club members can choose from a variety of subscriptions. The options currently available are daily, weekly or bi-weekly deliveries.

Dental care products designed by Daniela Cardona

Let me introduce a new talent on the design scene. Daniela Cardona, born and raised in Bogota, Colombia. She has designed these dental care products for Crest. Daniela moved to Pasadena, California in 2012 to pursue her dream of becoming a product designer. She is currently living in Los Angeles, CA after completing her B.S in Product…

Let me introduce a new talent on the design scene. Daniela Cardona, born and raised in Bogota, Colombia. She has designed these dental care products for Crest. Daniela moved to Pasadena, California in 2012 to pursue her dream of becoming a product designer. She is currently living in Los Angeles, CA after completing her B.S in Product Design at ArtCenter College of Design.

“The dental care industry has a wide range of products that satisfy all kinds of needs related to hygiene and health. The stores are saturated with colorful packaging competing to get every customer’s attention. The challenge was to re-design the current packaging system for Crest in order to help them grow their market share and have a consistent image throughout their product lines that will ideally transform the dental care industry. The re-branding of Crest has a clear and more relevant look. The graphics were designed to satisfy the brand’s needs, but most importantly the customer’s needs, so that when they go to the store to buy the products there is an evident simplicity. The new Crest is essential in providing attention and care to achieve the ultimate confident smile.”

Rewined Soap Packaging

Rewined is now introducing a new product. Stitch Design Co. designed packaging for their collection of subtly scented soaps. The packaging pulls from the core design elements of the candle packaging to seamlessly connect this new product to the brand. Letterpressed wood veneer wraps, color coded wax seals and signatures on each bar are just a few of those…

Rewined is now introducing a new product. Stitch Design Co. designed packaging for their collection of subtly scented soaps. The packaging pulls from the core design elements of the candle packaging to seamlessly connect this new product to the brand. Letterpressed wood veneer wraps, color coded wax seals and signatures on each bar are just a few of those details that make this brand so recognizable and special.

By Kristina de Verdier on 10 January, 2017 In , , , ,

Lip Rescue protects women from violence

Lip Rescue by Oriental Princess. A product designed to protect women in Thailand from violence. Following statistics showing that every 20 seconds, a woman is a victim of violence, the Thai beauty brand’s lipstick can also be used as a whistle to alert people nearby. Blowing on the safety whistle-style packaging emits a sound of up to…

lip-rescue-packaging-design-safety-3

Lip Rescue by Oriental Princess. A product designed to protect women in Thailand from violence. Following statistics showing that every 20 seconds, a woman is a victim of violence, the Thai beauty brand’s lipstick can also be used as a whistle to alert people nearby. Blowing on the safety whistle-style packaging emits a sound of up to 120 decibels – which can be heard 100 meters away, enabling women to call for help.

By Kristina de Verdier on 10 January, 2017 In , , ,

Words of Welcome

How can design help Syrian refugees instantly speaking German? The design system ‘Words of Welcome’ makes it possible! Created by DDB Group Germany, based in Berlin.

SITUATION

Germany has welcomed over one million refugees displaced by the conflict in Syria. Asylum seekers face new challenges in Germany: the majority of Syrian refugees cannot understand the German or English and are unable to read the Roman alphabet. This language barrier makes communication between asylum seekers and caregivers extremely difficult. The German government states that integration and basic communication are essential in providing meaningful support.

THE IDEA

Words of Welcome is a design system that turns every aid donation into a German language lesson for refugees. Together with language experts, we developed a phonetic system that combines German language and the Arabic script. We created phonetic transcriptions for the names of the most essential items and created a new label for these products. By reading these labels aloud in Arabic, refugees can instantly pronounce the word in perfect German. With every relabelled product refugees add a new German word to their vocabulary.

THE EXECUTION

In collaboration with multiple refugee shelters, we selected the most essential products that serve the basic needs of the refugees. Next, we developed a phonetic system together with language experts to create phonetic transcriptions for the names of these items. To support as many people as possible, we created these transcriptions in three languages: Arabic, Farsi and Urdu. By printing the transcriptions on a simple roll of box tape we made it easy for volunteers and refugees to repackage the donations on site. The tape uses 7 different colours representing different product categories – helping to differentiate food, sanitary, medical and baby products. The platform caters for the first 28 words every refugee needs to learn so they can communicate their basic needs. Even more words on their way to be produced. An online platform enables people to help spread the word to other citizens, brands and corporations to attract new sponsors.

By Kristina de Verdier on 3 January, 2017

Chilly’s Bottles

Are we ready to change our habits, and reuse one really good bottle, instead of throwing away tons of plastic? The Chilly’s Bottle is a reusable bottle that can keep your water ice cold for up to 24 hours. Chilly’s mission is to accelerate the adoption and everyday use of reusable products. They aim to do this through…

Are we ready to change our habits, and reuse one really good bottle, instead of throwing away tons of plastic? The Chilly’s Bottle is a reusable bottle that can keep your water ice cold for up to 24 hours. Chilly’s mission is to accelerate the adoption and everyday use of reusable products. They aim to do this through “creating products with the perfect balance of distinctive style and unrivalled performance.”

New material – Paptic

Andrew Dent, vice president of library and materials research at Material ConneXion presents 11 exciting new materials designers should watch, for the web magazine Fast Company. Blurring the line between paper and plastic, Paptic is a new material that is easy to print on, easy to recycle, and perfect for packaging. “It might not change…

paptic-innovative-packaging-material

Andrew Dent, vice president of library and materials research at Material ConneXion presents 11 exciting new materials designers should watch, for the web magazine Fast Company. Blurring the line between paper and plastic, Paptic is a new material that is easy to print on, easy to recycle, and perfect for packaging. “It might not change the world,” Dent admits, but he thinks we’ll soon start seeing it everywhere, because while it feels and looks like paper, it’s as strong and tear-proof as plastic. Check out the other 10 materials here.

To See Clearly: Technology Excess and Selection, by Jonas Lundin

The unceasing stream of promising innovations may offer tempting visions of a rewarding future—but no matter how attractive any technological break-through may appear to be it remains extremely important, indeed essential, to closely examine and interpret the inherent limitations and possibilities of each alternative.

Createchnology

About the never-ending stream of new technology innovations, and the relevance of them. By thinker & doer Jonas Lundin, based in Stockholm.

Today we live in a time of great promise; hardly a day passes without some new technological innovation being unveiled..  According to some observers, we shall almost certainly see in the next few years more scientific and technical advances than in the entire 20th century—whether these will truly be of a groundbreaking nature or merely incremental in character is a subject of lively debate for now and for the future.   

The unceasing stream of promising innovations may offer tempting visions of a rewarding future—but no matter how attractive any technological break-through may appear to be it remains extremely important, indeed essential, to closely examine and interpret the inherent limitations and possibilities of each alternative. In itself technology is nothing more than a means to some desired end, as yet incapable on its own of producing useful content or generating ideas, creating brands, strategies or products.

A problem can be faced time and again is that in creative sessions, and at decision time, the perceived limits of a particular technological concept all too soon are allowed to inhibit imaginative thinking—instead of the other way round. Complacency such as this (for that’s what it is) can result in persisting with unrewarding reiterative processes, following the same path to little avail over and over again—something that can go on for months and lead only to inadequate, half-baked solutions or, in some cases, relying upon, hoping for, some inspiration from somewhere else to rescue the situation.

Today there are a great number of fine examples of how to successfully harness technology to productive ends. Once mastered (assuming the possession of a sound business model, strategy and organizational form) it all boils down to the exercise of creativity, a grasp of content, and execution—and when our NPD teams successfully identify and exploit the most fruitful path to follow, the subsequent smooth flow of productive, creative energy, though scarcely noticed in operation, will achieve results.

Yes, easier said than done in today’s fiercely competitive world, where the necessity of being able to quickly adapt and put to use appropriate technology that can keep ahead of competitors and increase market share—is considered a mark of success.

I had a rant on this subject at a talk recently, and afterwards a gentleman came up to me and thanked me for giving him a few points to make in an upcoming board meeting. His CEO had been pursuing the strategy “buy something, then see what we can do with it”.  – Perhaps this would have been the right thing to do some decades ago, but today we are confronted with a smorgasbord of technological possibilities for almost all industrial and other activities, much of it of doubtful relevance, a fact that should stress how important it is for companies to be guided by creative insight and the ability to establish an image of themselves as agile, resourceful competitors in their field of activity. This just might be an appealing alternative mode of operation for Kodak-esque management to seek new possibilities and replace the efficiency chart with imaginative vision.

Finally, a litmus-test for reviewing NPD projects:

1. IDEA—is it powerful enough for your goals and purposes? Can your organization bring it off ? Can you carry it through easily?

2. CONTENT—do you find it as captivating as an enjoyable film, television show, or book?

3. RELEVANCE—Does it make sense? Is it of use? Is there a clear connection to field of activity? Will it make a difference, will it contribute to a better world?

4. ARCHITECTURE—is it scalable? Can you duplicate the process? Can you implement it cross-culturally? Intermedially?

5. TECHNOLOGY—old or new, does it serve your purpose?

Jonas Lundin, Stockholm

By Kristina de Verdier on 3 November, 2016