The Circle of Every Little Thing

Consumers begin to see responsible products not only as a good move for the future, but as a paradigm shift that needs to happen now. The circular economy suggests that our products will no longer just support our own needs, they will participate in a much bigger system.

We live in a world full of alarms; conflicts, terror and environmental disasters. It makes consumers increasingly worried and aware. As a reaction to this, consumers begin to see responsible products not only as a good move for the future, but as a paradigm shift that needs to happen now. The circular economy suggests that our products will no longer just support our own needs, they will participate in a much bigger system. We will need to continue pushing the boundaries of the circular economy and rethink products in terms of the entire value chain. In this movement, we need to see many more companies and organizations working together, across silos, towards better consumer behavior, encouraging responsible consumption. Consumers realize that their current consumption patterns need to be changed. To make this happen they are turning to the companies who respond and make action of their promises.

TO CONSIDER

-Think circularity, think across value chain, rethink waste

-How can you start with small actions (instead of the big words)?

-How can your products/services be participants in a bigger system?

-How can you work more across silos, companies and organisations?

GOOD EXAMPLES

Parley for the Oceans addresses major threats towards the oceans, the most important ecosystem of our planet. Parley believes the power for change lies in the hands of the consumer – given he has a choice – and the power to shape this new consumer mindset lies in the hands of the creative industries. Artists, musicians, actors, filmmakers, fashion designers, journalists, architects, product inventors, and scientists have the tools to mold the reality we live in and to develop alternative business models and ecologically sensible products to give us earthlings an alternative choice, an everyday option to change something.

Stella McCartney has woven sustainability into her company. She is open about the challenge/paradox of being both sustainable and fashionable at the same time. McCartney says that building environmentally sustainable practices into her own business has been a long-term commitment. Stella has made the brand highly visible in sustainable discussions globally, making her an opinion leader within the area. “We believe that the future of fashion is circular – it will be restorative and regenerative by design and the clothes we love never end up as waste.”

Recycled Coffee Cups

James Cropper 3D Products has been appointed by Lush Fresh Handmade Cosmetics as part of the brand’s commitment to finding ethically sourced packaging.

lush sustainable packaging product design 2

Lush introduced packaging made from recycled coffee cups in October 2017. An advanced processing technique is being used, to separate the plastic and paper, press-molding the paper to create the packaging. The square clam-shell box design can store up to four of Lush’s solid bath-oil products.

By Kristina de Verdier on 15 November, 2017 In , , , ,

The Iris Collection by Hay

The Iris collection, a new series of vases, mugs and penholders in porcelain, designed by Clara von Zweigbergk for Hay. The collection is inspired by folding paper and the super thin porcelain of Anita Japan makes the series extremely strong while still looking fragile. 

Many of the products Clara von Zweigbergk has designed originate from her work with paper. “I have a big love for paper and folding it. I once had a colleague who named me the “paperholic”, he caught me far too often with a freshly shopped roll of paper. So appropriately, the Iris Collection stems from experimenting in folding rounded shapes in various paper weights. One shape led to another and quite soon there was around 20 pieces of paper objects, vases, pen holders and later mugs. The best ones are actually made out of the last sheets of a much-loved Japanese paper, in very unusual (for print) colours, bought in Tokyo.”

By Kristina de Verdier on 18 September, 2017 In , , , , ,

Forest Bath

Shinrin-yoku is a Japanese term that means “taking in the forest atmosphere” or “forest bathing.” It was developed in Japan during the 1980s and has become a cornerstone of preventive health care and healing in Japanese medicine.

Forest bathing Japan consumer trends 2018

We live in an age of interruption. People keep their phone near them almost all the time during day and night. Even though the connected world is offering both convenience and social interactions, consumers increasingly seek meaningful and simpler experiences offline. People are looking for personal enrichment beyond the worlds of work, social media, and city life – some are escaping to the nature, some are going to yoga, others leave their phone at home when going to the restaurant with their friends.

Researchers primarily in Japan and South Korea have established a robust body of scientific literature on the health benefits of spending time under the canopy of a living forest. Now their research is helping to establish shinrin-yoku and forest therapy throughout the world. The aim of forest bathing, is to slow down and become immersed in the natural environment. The idea is simple: if a person simply visits a natural area and walks in a relaxed way there are calming, rejuvenating and restorative benefits to be achieved. The practice originated in Japan where it is called shinrin-yoku (森林浴).

By Kristina de Verdier on 14 September, 2017

Inflated Origami By MIT

A team of MIT Media Lab researchers has developed inflated origami. A network of air channels in geometric patterns on sheets of paper, plastic, or textile. This creates inflatable pinched pouches which are subsequently connected and layered to take on complex folding forms.

MIT inflated origami packaging innovation

A computer program allows the designer to experiment and fine-tune shapes and patterns in a simulator. Once the desired response emerges digitally, the structure is fabricated. Via Frame.

Stretchable Battery Made From Fabric

A stretchable battery made entirely out of textiles could usher in the next generation of wearable electronics. A team of researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York has developed a textile-based, bacteria-powered bio-battery.

Stretchable battery technology material trends 2018

The battery is a flexible and stretchable microbial fuel cell (MFC) monolithically integrated into a single sheet of textile substrate. “There is a clear and pressing need for flexible and stretchable electronics that can be easily integrated with a wide range of surroundings to collect real-time information,” Binghamton University Electrical and Computer Science Assistant Professor Seokheun Choi said in a statement. “Those electronics must perform reliably even while intimately used on substrates with complex and curvilinear shapes, like moving body parts or organs. “We considered a flexible, stretchable, miniaturized biobattery as a truly useful energy technology because of their sustainable, renewable and eco-friendly capabilities,” he added. Source R&D Mag.

By Kristina de Verdier on 7 August, 2017

FORM

FORM is a hair care collection that celebrates beauty in all its forms and was developed to address the hair issues women have been facing for decades.

The collection, which consists of ten products, will help make hair care simpler, by offering products specifically designed for individual hair needs. Whether hair is coily, curly, natural, relaxed or somewhere in between, FORM’s personal and versatile products will help. Designed by Jones knowles ritchie (JKR), a global design agency with offices in London, New York, Shanghai and Singapore. Via Under Consideration.

Sustainable Shoe Box

After two years of designing, researching and testing, the ultimate sustainability shoe packaging has been developed. It’s designed to be more sustainable and cost effective compared to traditional shoe boxes

Viupax revolutionary shoe packaging, designed by Andreas Kioroglou, founder of the Greece based design studio Matadog Design. After two years of designing, researching and testing, the ultimate sustainability shoe packaging has been developed, as it incorporates a number of innovative features. It’s designed to be more sustainable and cost effective compared to traditional shoe boxes by using much less cardboard and less volume.

It uses 20-57% less material and occupies 20-50% less volume.

It is designed to be cost efficient in matters of production and transportation and above all designed in such a way to improve personnel productivity and user experience. It is designed to be flexible in stacking allowing them to be stored in many new and interesting ways. It eliminates the use of bag as it can be converted into a carry bag or shoulder bag to be easily transported by the customer.

Malko – Less is future

Malko is an Italian product design brand that was born to inspire an eco-­friendly lifestyle, with “Less  is  future” at the heart of the development.

“Less  is  future”  is  the  slogan  with  which  Malko  talks  to  the  world:  the fight  against  waste is  one  of  the  challenges  of  the  third  millennium.  It  must  be  won  by  changing daily habits. Malko  is an  Italian  product  design  brand  that  was  born  to  inspire  an  eco-­friendly  lifestyle.  Its  mission  is  the  reduction  of  the  disposable  plastic  bottles  use  through  the  new design  of  the  Malko  Bottle. The  bottle is made from stainless  steel, keeping  your  drinks  cold  for  24  hours  and  warm  for  12  hours.  Hygienic,  leak proof,  taste  and  odour  free.

Luis  Benassi,  Malko’s  founder:  “We  understood  the  importance  of  being  part  of  the  solution when  we  realized  the  insane  and  irrational  use  of  plastic  bottles,  with  the  huge  risk  of  ocean’s  pollution.” The Malko Bottle project will be launched the 20th of June 2017 with a Kickstarter campaign.

Shape-Shifting Pasta

Researchers at the MIT Media Lab’s Tangible Media Group have managed to make shape-shifting pasta!

Researchers at the MIT Media Lab’s Tangible Media Group have managed to make shape-shifting pasta, edible origami 🙂 Why? To package and ship pasta more efficiently for example. But of course they have many examples of culinary potential for this technology.

The researchers have created flat sheets of gelatin and starch that, when submerged in water, instantly sprout into three-dimensional structures, including common pasta shapes such as macaroni and rotini. The researchers presented their work in a paper this month at the Association for Computing Machinery’s 2017 Computer-Human Interaction Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. They describe their shape-morphing creations as not only culinary performance art, but also a practical way to reduce food-shipping costs.

“We did some simple calculations, such as for macaroni pasta, and even if you pack it perfectly, you still will end up with 67 percent of the volume as air,” says Wen Wang, a co-author on the work and a former graduate student and research scientist in MIT’s Media Lab. “We thought maybe in the future our shape-changing food could be packed flat and save space.”

Zlatan Myth Design

After launching two beloved fragrances, Zlatan Ibrahimović Parfums is releasing its third collection – MYTH WOOD and MYTH BLOOM. The scents capture the elusive magic of Zlatan’s home country – the forests, nature and calm of Sweden. Zlatan worked closely with Olivier Pescheux, one of the world’s leading perfumers from Givaudan in Paris.

zlatan-mth-packaging-design-11

After launching two beloved fragrances, Zlatan Ibrahimović Parfums is releasing its third collection – MYTH WOOD and MYTH BLOOM. The scents capture the elusive magic of Zlatan’s home country – the forests, nature and calm of Sweden. Zlatan worked closely with Olivier Pescheux, one of the world’s leading perfumers from Givaudan in Paris.

Mirage Arabica Coffee Concept

A team of Armenia-based designers have created a product in which each of them can find their favorite flavor of coffee (espresso, cappuccino, mocha, latte, americano). “We took coffee Arabica and visualized 5 types of coffee connecting them to each other. We decided to separate the ingredients by turning them into colors. Next, we illustrated them in a form…

A team of Armenia-based designers have created a product in which each of them can find their favorite flavor of coffee (espresso, cappuccino, mocha, latte, americano).

“We took coffee Arabica and visualized 5 types of coffee connecting them to each other. We decided to separate the ingredients by turning them into colors. Next, we illustrated them in a form of desert. We have solved the visualization issue of diverse types of coffee by transforming the desert landscape into corresponding color pieces. The coffee water was depicted in the form of clear blue sky, chocolate in the form of desert cliffs, milk in the form of light feathery clouds and foam milk in a more dense cloudy form. Camels and small oases betray an even bigger association of the desert. In order to show different types separately, we created a window. By rotating it you can find layers of particular coffee. The concept of desert itself became the inspiration of the name of packaging. Distorted layers and wet technique remind of desert mirage. Mirages are optical illusions that people experience out of severe need in desert. Applying this idea, we transformed it into a severe urge for drinking the coffee.”

RESULT

“We created flexible, bright and memorable packaging for Arabic coffee. The visual elements in the packaging highlight Arabian culture through the use of calligraphy, rhombuses, the window, and colors. As a result, the packaging becomes a window through which you can find your preferable coffee aroma in the desert. Spin it around, wander through the desert and find your flavour.”

CREDITS

Design: Karen Gevorgyan
Illustration: Armenak Grigoryan
Calligraphy: Maria Gevorgyan
Copywriting: Ani Gevorgyan
Photography: Arnos Martirosyan
By Kristina de Verdier on 9 May, 2017 In , ,

Packaging from milk protein

The French start-up company Laptops has created a water soluble and biodegradable thermoplastic pellets based on milk protein

The French start-up company Lactips started in 2014 with the purpose to tackle the problem of environmental waste. In order to do this they produce water soluble and biodegradable thermoplastic pellets based on milk protein. Those pellets are used as a raw material for thermoforming, film, or any kind of plastic applications. You have probably seen their soluble film for dish detergent, which is fully integrated with the product – there is no need for the consumer to remove the packaging. So now the company has taken another exciting step in the global packaging development. They have developed an edible plastic packaging for the food industry, created from milk protein (casein).

Hinoki by Nine

Hinoki is a beautiful sustainable packaging concept created for the cosmetics industry. It’s designed by Swedish innovation agency NINE. NINE is a future-driven innovation consultancy, part of the BillerudKorsnäs Group, a publicly traded company and global provider of smarter packaging for a sustainable future. CHALLENGE: In the Cosmetics Industry, the notion of  “premium” products is commonly connected to…

Hinoki is a beautiful sustainable packaging concept created for the cosmetics industry. It’s designed by Swedish innovation agency NINE. NINE is a future-driven innovation consultancy, part of the BillerudKorsnäs Group, a publicly traded company and global provider of smarter packaging for a sustainable future.

CHALLENGE: In the Cosmetics Industry, the notion of  “premium” products is commonly connected to the “little extras” on the packaging. Many times, this extra packaging is not entirely necessary and only used during a limited time and then simply discarded. For Hinoki, we wanted to create a sustainable packaging range that is premium, respectful to the planet and a true game-changer in the world of packaging.

SOLUTION: Hinoki is a range of travel-size packaging made out of biodegradable paper for organic skin care products. It’s a concept based on simplicity, single-origin, and respect for the renewable material applied to a currently quite un-sustainable packaging category. The structural design of Hinoki is inspired by the form-language of origami as a means of being true to the value of the material. Each container uses a single piece of laminated paper, folded and pressed into shape, with a tear-off corner revealing a Hinoki wood twist cap.

RESULT: The result is a tactile and natural skin care range with premium value, coming not from artificial inflation, but rather an honest representation and respect for the value of both packaging materials and product experience. The concept is based on existing material and technology. It is currently in the process of being up-scaled. NINE together with Billerud Korsnäs will invite one brand owner partner, in a first mover ambition to develop concepts together with us for sustainable solutions projected to be on the market within 24-36 months.

Make Smart Matter

Consumers are embracing the smartness which is seamlessly integrated in their reality. It is the marriage of technology and simplicity that will help brands connect with consumers in exceptional ways.

Amazon Go

Consumers can shop anytime, anywhere and are becoming increasingly demanding in terms of convenience. New technology integrated in consumers’ product experiences is only going to grow, advances in materials science, components are getting smaller. As this sector is quickly evolving in many areas, one thing is clear though; consumers and brand owners now want usable products, that adds real value to their lives, rather than short-term marketing gimmicks. How can smart components help prevent food waste, ensure product safety, generate and store meaningful data for medical purpose, or make the weekly shopping easier? Consumers are embracing the smartness which is seamlessly integrated in their reality. It is the marriage of technology and simplicity that will help brands connect with consumers in exceptional ways.

TO CONSIDER

-What real consumer problems needs to be solved?

-How can I create a seamless experience, integrated in consumers’ lifestyle?

-How can the solution be intuitive?

GOOD EXAMPLE

Amazon Go is a new kind of store with no checkout required. Amazon created the world’s most advanced shopping technology so you never have to wait in line. Use the Amazon Go app to enter the store, take the products you want, and go! Amazon uses sensors, video-technology and AI-algoritms to enable this convenient shopping experience.

By Kristina de Verdier on 24 March, 2017 In , , ,