Seaweed based material by Japanese AMAM

Created by the design agency AMAM from Japan. They have developed a more environmentally friendly plastic material, based on Agar.

Created by the design agency AMAM from Japan. They have developed a more environmentally friendly plastic material, based on Agar. Agar is a gelatinous material that can be readily found in red marine algae. The material is still in prototyping phase, and is of high interest for the packaging industry, who is constantly working on improving their impact on the earth. This project is one of four finalists for the 2016 Lexus Design Award, which is pairing each team with a design mentor to bring a prototype to life for Milan Design Week. Via Good.

By Kristina de Verdier on 23 March, 2016

The future meatball by Space10

The Ikea Meatball Reimagined in 8 Different Ways, by Space10, Ikea’s independently-run innovation lab in downtown Copenhagen. They set out to explore how we can produce more food with less, and in a more sustainable way then today. Alternative ingredients, technological innovations and uncharted gastronomic territories, that we need to consider to combat our unsustainable appetite for meat and…

The Ikea Meatball Reimagined in 8 Different Ways, by Space10, Ikea’s independently-run innovation lab in downtown Copenhagen. They set out to explore how we can produce more food with less, and in a more sustainable way then today. Alternative ingredients, technological innovations and uncharted gastronomic territories, that we need to consider to combat our unsustainable appetite for meat and the explosive demand for more food in the future.

“We used the meatball’s shape and size as a canvas for future foods scenarios, because we wanted to visualise complicated research in a simple, fun and familiar way. There’s hardly any culture that does not cook meatballs – from the Swedish meatball, to Italian/American spaghetti meatballs to spiced up Middle Eastern kofta,” says Kaave Pour from Space10.

Like it or not, meat-eating and our increasing demand for food is becoming a problem for everyone on the planet. Our meat production is impacting global warming significantly, uses dwindling supplies of fresh water, destroys forests and grasslands, and causes soil erosion, while pollution and animal waste create dead zones in coastal areas and smother coral reefs. In addition to this, our demand for food will increase with 70% within the next 35 years according to the UN. We need to be smarter and more efficient about the way we produce our food and be more open minded about food diversity, as our global population grows and climate change cuts into the water and land that’s available for farming.

“It’s quite difficult to picture that in the near future we will be eating insects or artificial meat. But, with the increasing demand for food, we need to start considering adding alternative ingredients to our daily menu. You could say that Tomorrow’s Meatball gets people a little more familiar with the unfamiliar.” – says Bas van de Poel, who was creative in residence at Space10, where he worked closely together with Space10-creative Kaave Pour to create the Tomorrow’s Meatball project.

Kickstarter campaign for cricket snack bar

Grub will this month launch a Kickstarter campaign as it seeks to help part-fund the launch of its new snack bar, made using cricket flour. The brand, which already uses crickets in a number of its snack products including roasted crickets and cricket nut fudge, has developed a recipe and design for the bar but now needs…

Grub will this month launch a Kickstarter campaign as it seeks to help part-fund the launch of its new snack bar, made using cricket flour.

The brand, which already uses crickets in a number of its snack products including roasted crickets and cricket nut fudge, has developed a recipe and design for the bar but now needs the money to make it happen. Every backer that pledges money to the campaign will receive one of differing rewards in return for their investment. Described as a rich mix of super-healthy ingredients and a great source of protein, the new bar could be ready to go into production early next year with availability beginning in April.

Grub also has plans to release an insect cookbook and establish the UK’s first cricket-for-food farm. “We have been eating insects for hundreds of years,” pointed out Grub co-founder Shami Radia. “They are such an abundant food source it seems crazy not to use them. We’ve just got to get over our fear of eating them.” Via Food Bev

By Kristina de Verdier on 15 November, 2015

Meon by Beatrice Menis & Anna Johansson

Designed by Beatrice Menis & Anna Johansson. This project was born from a one-day-only creative exercise. The idea was to keep it as creative as possible in a short amount of time; we had to come up with a concept and bring it to live: that’s how Meon was born. What is Meon? It’s a brand for neon…

Designed by Beatrice Menis Anna Johansson. This project was born from a one-day-only creative exercise. The idea was to keep it as creative as possible in a short amount of time; we had to come up with a concept and bring it to live: that’s how Meon was born. What is Meon? It’s a brand for neon colour hair dyes.

Nowadays the market is full of crazy hair dyes, from shocking pink to dreamy turquoise, but the packaging is lacking personality, definitely not reflecting the bold individual buying the product. This is the reason why we’ve decided to turn things around and create Meon, a packaging that would truly reflect the personality of the product inside!

The naming “Meon” derives from neon; we’ve added the “me” in front of it which reflects the personality of the brand and of the consumer. It’s all about crafting your own identity through your own image, so we thought that creating a brand name that would directly talked to consumers was an effective way of communication.

The Meon range comes in four neon colours; acid green, fairy blue, polly pink and hot orange. Each colour comes with an adjective that describes both the colour and the personality of the consumer buying it. The colour personalities are supported by a sentence on the packaging; for example the “Acid Green” colour comes along with the sentence “Stay Wild”. Last but not least the outer packaging warns that this product is “not for cowards” provoking the consumers buying it.

By Kristina de Verdier on 10 November, 2015 In , , ,

Paperlux™

I’ve always been extra excited about paper, and the art of paper folding. Paperlux, a Hamburg-based design studio specializes in paper etchings and paper-based packaging for high end clients like Hermès, Volkswagen and Alexander McQueen. Founded in 2006, the studio has grown into a team of 11 designers with a passion for paper. “We love…

I’ve always been extra excited about paper, and the art of paper folding. Paperlux, a Hamburg-based design studio specializes in paper etchings and paper-based packaging for high end clients like Hermès, Volkswagen and Alexander McQueen. Founded in 2006, the studio has grown into a team of 11 designers with a passion for paper. “We love paper not only because it is sustainable and has been around forever,” writes Paperlux’s Valentina Freischem in an email. “It is also wonderful because the different grammatures, different coatings and feels of the surface can transport so many messages” they say in an article written by Fastcodesign. The images you see here is from a fashion accessory project, beautiful!

By Kristina de Verdier on 28 August, 2015