Trend Seminar 2019

Ambalaj’s founder Kristina de Verdier teams up with Swedish digital innovation agency Unicorn Titans to offer 2019 trend sessions. Learn about how Trusted Truth, Curated Care, It Takes a Circle to be Circular, Frictionless Experiences, and Co-Creation Economy will impact your business the coming year(s). These are trends that are changing people’s everyday lives worldwide and creating new realities for every company.

Is your organisation interested to start the new year with a fresh trend session? Perfect for seminars, workshops and internal meetings

The ever-changing market landscape is affecting every company, facing new realities such as digitalization and urgency of sustainability. In order to do a good job, we need to ground ourselves in the needs of the people we are creating for. But we also need to understand what is technically feasible in the near and long-term future. Oscar Berg & Kristina de Verdier will take you on a journey through 5 trends that are shaping the future. Learn about how Trusted Truth, Curated Care, It Takes a Circle to be Circular, Frictionless Experiences, and Co-Creation Economy will impact your business the coming year(s). These are trends that are changing people’s everyday lives worldwide, thus relevant to different industries. These 5 trend platforms provide you with cured output based on our continuous global research work. We will present future-facing insights, crucial need-to-know principles and showcase global practical examples.

About Oscar: Works as Business Designer and CEO at Unicorn Titans, a Swedish digital innovation agency. He’s a frequent keynote speaker on digital transformation and the future of work, and author of Superpowering People – Designing The Collaborative Digital Organization and Digital Workplace Strategy & Design.

About Kristina: Founder of ambalaj.se and Design Director at KDV Design Studio. She helps companies navigate through complex design & innovation projects and through strategic practice delivers clear and actionable guidance to make sure the insights are turned into human-centered design solutions. She’s a frequent trend speaker and coaching organisations in design thinking.

BOOK NOW!

For more information, or to book this presentation for your own business or event, please contact us at kristina@ambalaj.se or oscar@unicorntitans.com or fill out your details here.

Zero Waste Bistro – Circular economy model

Addressing leftovers in the hospitality industry, Zero Waste Bistro sources and serves sustainability

A pop-up restaurant that is built from recycled food packaging and that composts all of its leftovers has been set up at the WantedDesign Manhattan fair. Addressing leftovers in the hospitality industry, Zero Waste Bistro sources and serves sustainability. Durat, a polyester composite with a granular texture, used for table and serving items. Walls crafted from Tetra Pak packaging and a communal dining table and table set made with recycled and fully recyclable plastic. All food scraps the bistro produced is composted and turned into organic mulch for local farmers.

By Kristina de Verdier on 10 October, 2018

Known Supply – Know your T-shirt maker

“We believe our world would look much different if shoppers could know the people who made their garments.”

Knowssupply design transparency 2

Apparel company Known Supply celebrates the people who make clothing by putting a tag with the labourer’s signature. “We believe our world would look much different if shoppers could know the people who made their garments. Those items would be cherished, their value signifying so much more than ‘another t-shirt’”. Known Supply makes organic cotton T-shirts and other basics in ethically minded factories located in Peru, Uganda, and India.

Circular Economy Kitchen by Reform

Danish design brand Reform has created a new Everyday classic. This kitchen consists of cuts that are left when Dinesen has supplied floors to places like galleries, restaurants & mansions.

Danish design brand Reform’s projects start with a basic ingredient – elements from the IKEA kitchen. Add architect-designed fronts and countertops to create an aesthetic and a personal style that combines quality construction, function and timeless design. Together with designers they want to challenge the traditional kitchen industry by bringing timeless appeal of furniture to the cooking areas of our homes – creating new ‘Everyday Classics’. 

Through the years, it’s been a big wish of Reform’s founders to offer a sustainable kitchen design. In this new design Reform has collaborated with one of the top architecture companies when it comes to circular economics in sustainable buildings around the world, Lendager Group. Lendager Group has exclusive rights to use the surplus wood from floor-company Dinesen, which was the last little part that made this collaboration a perfect fit. In an exclusive company like Dinesen, customer-specific solutions are produced, which generates large amounts of residual wood. Therefore, the kitchen consists of cuts that are left when Dinesen has supplied floors to galleries, restaurants and mansions.
 

Cocot plant-based foods

A whole-food, plant-based diet is centered on whole, unrefined or minimally refined plants. It’s a diet based on fruits, vegetables, tubers, whole grains and legumes and it excludes or minimises meat. Have a look at these beautifully designed plants-based products.

    Inspired by cow blotches and colors of the earth and nature. These products are aimed at a selected audience of vegans who take care of the environment and their health. For the logo, a simple and geometric typeface was selected that made a contrast with the rusticity of the spots. A series of iconographies were designed that refer to times when man was fed only with natural products. Their approach with clean, sans-serif typography gives Cocot a luxurious feel mostly associated with high-end fashion brands. Designed by Mamba Studio.

By Kristina de Verdier on 29 May, 2018 In ,

Bio Design by Puma & MIT

A breathing sports shoe, that grows its own air passageways to enable personalized ventilation? A learning insole that prevents fatigue and improves athletes’ performance? A t-shirt that responds to environmental factors by changing its appearance to inform the wearer about the air quality? What sounds like future visions are actually research results by Sports company PUMA and the MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Design Lab

PUMA and MIT Design Lab have been conducting research in the field of biodesign since June 2017. Biodesign is the practice of using living materials such as algae or bacteria to create products. It makes possible a football jersey made from the silk of a spider or a shoe box grown from mycelium, the root structure of mushrooms. PUMA Biodesign explores the new frontiers of biological design and fabrication to bring advances in science and biotechnologies closer to our daily lives through sport products.

Four initial experiments that derived from that study were exhibited at this year’s Milan Design Week. The four initial projects include a Breathing Shoe, which is a biologically active shoe that enables personalised ventilation by growing its own air passageways to keep the foot cool; Deep Learning Insoles, which collate realtime biofeedback by using organisms to measure chemical phenomena that indicates things like fatigue; Carbon Eaters, which is a microbially-active t-shirt that responds to its environment to change its appearance and inform the wearer about air quality; and Adaptive Packaging, a biologically programmable material that can change its shape and structure to become a new type of alive, biodegradable and adaptive packaging. See the videos here.

Dear Tea Society

Tea packaging designed by Open Studio Stockholm. The inspiration comes from classical tea salons and British member clubs. They created a fictional members club, where all teas have their own personality. And the result is something we haven’t seen in the food shelves before!

 
Designed by Open Studio Stockholm. The mission was to develop a whole new Nordic tea concept that could stand for quality, sustainability, innovation, and traceability – in a playful way. “Our idea was to create a fictional members club, where all teas have their own personality. Every blend/infution is personalized with a portrait and a charming personal description. We wanted the tea to feel as an interesting (and often eccentric!) characters that you’d like to meet over a cup.”

“The inspiration comes from classical tea salons and British member clubs, but at the same time we wanted to create something contemporary that makes tea drinking as urban and modern as the barista culture. The member clubs brought our thoughts to libraries that led us to the book-like design. The tea packages are placed on the shelf with the back outwards for easy reading of the title, sort and flavour.”

In addition to visual identity, naming and packaging design, they have also developed a physical meeting place for tea lovers in the form of a showroom/office/tea shop. On the walls are the actual paintings from the packages hanging.
By Kristina de Verdier on 12 April, 2018 In , ,

Cocofloss making flossing a fun experience

Cocofloss is a California based company making flossing a fun and rewarding experience. Mexico-based Anagrama has used vivid pastel based colors and metallic foil to give a holographic finish that enhances its lively and clean nature.

Cocofloss is a California based company making flossing a fun and rewarding experience. Mexico-based Anagrama has been designing awesome stuff again. This is how they explain their work for Cocofloss: “They offer a great variety of dental floss with a preoccupation for design. The graphic syntax developed for this project displays Cocofloss amusing essence within the interplay created by the various present elements. The pastel based colors alludes to the brand’s main values, diverting from the already age-worn clinical white more common for all things oral care. This was then matched with an elegant logo composition creating a more refined character. The metallic foil gives the whole aesthetic a holographic finish that enhances its lively and clean nature.” Via The Dieline.

By Kristina de Verdier on 3 April, 2018 In , , ,

4 Sustainable Design Principles

Nowadays sustainability is an integral part of most development projects, a filter all new designs should go through. Sustainability is part of what we call “good design” and everyone is responsible – it’s a cross-functional mission. Here are 4 design principles that can help us in these efforts.

Several aspects influence the sustainability of a product or service and it’s not easy to define which development activities to focus on, to create the best possible impact on our planet. What is clear though, is that design based on human needs, is the best starting point for sustainable design. John Thackara, author and one of the most influential voices within sustainability, states that we are filling our world with stuff, but we forget to ask ourselves “What are these things for” “What value do they add to our lives” Sometimes we focus blindly on new technology, while we probably should look into which problems to solve first. A designer’s most important role is to define these needs and make the new offering relevant and intuitive to the user.

#1 LESS IS FUTURE

We live in a world where we are constantly occupied; stores, web-sites, homes are filled with options – people are over-whelmed! A crucial task is therefore to simplify. Simplifying a product or service may sound easy, but achieving it in a meaningful way, is complex. “Less-ness” can as well be to create products with better quality, which creates less hustle for consumers as well as for the environment! Let’s ask ourselves how we can simplify the right way through the entire value chain. How can we use less material, or rather how can we minimise the amount of material that needs to be wasted?

Example: A team of MIT Media Lab researchers has developed inflated origami. A network of air channels in geometric patterns on sheets of paper, plastic, or textile.

#2 FOCUS ON THE EXPERIENCE

People do not think of a product, brand or communication separately – People buy an experience. Which means we must design for the holistic experiences. If we focus on the needs that should be solved, instead of how products look today, it results in a better user experience and increases the potential of more sustainable products. Perhaps parts of the need can be solved digitally with less footprint? When we focus on the holistic experience we have the opportunity to integrate more and eliminate useless fuzz that might just be there as a heritage from the past.

Example: IKEA’s iconic bags are famous for being reused for the most fantastic purposes, in people’s everyday lives. Now re-designed by Hay and even more desired.

#3 CIRCULAR CHOICES

Material choice is often a big question in development activities. Again, there are no simple answers regarding sustainability and material choice. But there are some basic guidelines to follow. How can we minimize the amount of different materials? How can we increase the proportion of materials made from renewable sources? How can we think circularly, think along the whole value chain, consider recycling, change the view of waste? A circular economy aims to maintain products, components and materials to its highest benefit and value all the time. Last but not least, how can we help consumers to understand what material it is, which increases the chances that it’s handled and recycled correctly.

Example: Lego’s botanical elements such as leaves, bushes and trees will be made from plant-based plastic sourced from sugarcane in the future and will appear in LEGO boxes already in 2018

#4 SHARING & CARING

It’s getting more and more accepted for consumers to have access to things instead of owning them, especially for the younger generation. The big difference companies make when creating a product as part of the sharing economy, is that instead of asking “what should we create” the question is “how can we deliver on this need”. The sharing economy is about being in a broader context than just “my company”. My products should not only cater to my own needs, but they will contribute / be part of a much larger system.

Example: Care by Volvo is a new alternative to owning or leasing a Volvo car. Volvo calls it the future of the car experience, where a simple monthly subscription is all you need and you can easily share the car through a digital key.

Inné – A Tactile Fragrance Concept

“As you awaken to your divine nature, you’ll begin to appreciate beauty in everything you see, touch and experience.” Wayne Dyer. 

The INNÉ’s fragrance concept, designed by Thitipol Chaimattayompol. A concept which ties nicely to our earlier post about Touching Realities. Touch is one of the most important sensory modality in driving consumer behavior. The increasing lack of texture in people’s lives makes experiences become one-dimensional. So now, smart brands have be focusing more on how their products feel! By elevating the details and integrating elements of tactility, companies will consequently need to have a clear strategy on the tactile components of their brand.

“The INNÉ brand conveys a simple daylight lifestyle, while the bottle has the more complex design that links to sophisticated personality. The outer character looks simple as an ordinary individual, after touching and experiencing with the fragrance scent will evoke the inner personality to become more sensitive. The beauty is in detail of senses. The intricate texture on the bottle evokes the new personality which more complicated. The design has incorporated the touch sensation on the bottle’s surface.”

By Kristina de Verdier on 21 March, 2018 In , ,

LEGO BRICKS WITH PLANT-BASED PLASTICS

LEGO botanical elements such as leaves, bushes and trees will be made from plant-based plastic sourced from sugarcane in the future and will appear in LEGO boxes already in 2018.

Lego green plastics sustainable design 1

The new LEGO elements are made from polyethylene, produced from sugar-cane instead of oil. Just to clarify, the end-product is  still plastic – but the source is renewable. Polyethylene elements are 1-2% of the total amount of plastic elements produced by the LEGO Group; The sustainable product range covers LEGO botanical elements such as leaves, bushes and trees made entirely from plant-based plastic.

It’s not easy to get a clear answer which material choices are the ultimate ones for the planet. Several aspects influence the sustainability of a material. It is to a high degree determined by its source, chemical composition, its use (in a product) and management (at end-of-life), and the impact it can have in both environmental and social areas.

Though “sustainable material” can be a loose term, Lego notes that it believes the new material must “have an ever-lighter footprint than the material it replaces.” This is considered across impact areas like fossil fuel use, human rights, and climate change. Lego also has investments in wind power and has introduced paper pulp trays for its Lego advent calendars, which reduces plastic waste in landfills. These moves are part of the LEGO Group’s commitment to use sustainable materials in core products and packaging by 2030.

Milkadamia – plant-based future of food

The food industry is being re-shaped as we speak, driven by startups that are responding to consumer demand of healthy and responsible products. Australian Milkadamia makes plant-based milk pressed from raw macadamia nuts.

We welcome a new friend to the world of dairy alternatives! Milkadamia, a plant milk made from macadamia nuts. CEO of Milkdamia Jim Richards told Food Navigator that he thinks clever packaging and relatable branding will be their way to stand out from almond, soy, oat et al in the fridge. The milk is pressed from raw nuts grown on a family farm in the Northern Rivers region of New South Wales, Australia, the macadamia’s native habitat. The farm cultivates the trees in a manner said to promote healthy soil. Macadamias boast a variety of health benefits. The nuts are thought to promote brain health, bone health and heart health as well as being completely cholesterol-free and packed full of protein. Milkadamia offers four different products: Original, Unsweetened, Unsweetened Vanilla and Latte de Barista. In 2018 it will be available in the refrigerated section of Walmart as well.

Good reads: One Green Planet writes about the future of food and the new conscious food economy which is rising. Bon Appetite rates The 4 Best Non-Dairy Milks Besides Almond.

By Kristina de Verdier on 20 February, 2018

Health Wearables by L’Oreal & Fuseproject

Beauty Tech is a huge space that hasn’t been explored much. L’Oréal’s Technology Incubator has teamed up with Fuseproject to develop two UV wearable sensors, aiming to make sunbathing healthier for people.

A ‘UV wearable’ is a stick-on sensor that tracks sun exposure, lowering the risk of skin cancer by raising personal awareness around how much sun is too much. L’Oreal’s technology incubator teamed up with Fuseproject to create the first product, My UV Patch launched in 2016. Now the next product is being launched, called UV Sense. UV Sense is the world’s first battery-free UV wearable, connecting to an app where personalised information and advice on sun exposure can be easily accessed.

My UV Patch is comprised of a series of tiles with photoreactive dyes that respond to UV rays, set against neutral reference points. Fuseproject was challenged to design a patch that followed these technical constrains, while designing new styles as body ornaments. By challenging the technical elements and shrinking them, we developed an aesthetic that could be directed into any number of stylistic collections. Working around the hand, arm, and wrist, we established a core collection that truly marries fashion with function; the My UV Patch redesign is sophisticated and discreet, a take on modern jewelry, with bold architecture and tonality.

UV Sense is an even smaller, dome-based sensor, that fits directly on a thumbnail, or an accessory like sunglasses. Subtle patterns laid directly over the outer shell create playful and iconic expressions similar to nail-art, with clear versions for those who prefer simplicity. A miniscule window in the shell allows for light to enter; data collected and stored is then transferred directly to the mobile app through an NFC chip

Electric off-road motorcycle

The Swedish company CAKE’s new invention Kalk, is a new kind of electric off-road motorbike, a combination of motorcycle and bicycle with electric drive.

The Swedish company CAKE’s new invention Kalk, is a new kind of electric off-road motorbike, a combination of motorcycle and bicycle with electric drive. CAKE’s mission is to speed up the journey towards a zero emission society, while enhancing excitement and fun. All components are made from scratch to optimize the riding performance in this new category. Every little detail is elaborated for perfection, while considering the perspectives of sustainability. The motorbikes are light and silent with a range of 50 miles.

 

Nike React

When Nike asked runners what they wanted out of their running shoes, they got very specific answers: They said they wanted better cushioning. They also said they wanted better energy return. And they needed their shoes to be lightweight, of course.

Nike React Technology, now available for runners too! When Nike asked runners what they wanted out of their running shoes, they got very specific answers: They said they wanted better cushioning. They also said they wanted better energy return. And they needed their shoes to be lightweight, of course. Oh, and they had to last too. In a way, they wanted everything. The tricky thing is that these four qualities are incredibly difficult to deliver in one material because they’re opposites.

“Nike React foam cushioning” launched in June 2017 in basketball — a sport that requires players to shift direction and speed in seamless motion and to lift off at the blink of an eye. With the basketball shoes, designers encased the Nike React foam in order to provide durability and stability for traction control the players needed, but with running, engineers uncaged Nike React technology to showcase its full potential for the road.

To get there, Nike’s in-house chemists and mechanical engineers came together to test ingredients to see which composition would yield the perfect outcome. It was a process that demonstrated Nike’s in-house manufacturing ingenuity. After more than 400 hundred combinations of chemistry and processing, and using scientific methods to dial in on materials with certain amenable attributes, they landed the unique composition of Nike React foam.

By Kristina de Verdier on 24 January, 2018